Cead with rare and lave a good haugh; there can’t be too many more like these.

READ REVIEW

RUNNY BABBIT RETURNS

ANOTHER BILLY SOOK

Twelve years later, a return to the ween groods for more vunny ferses.

Runny Babbit and his spooneristic woodland friends are back in 41 new silly, short poems full of nonsense and linguistic play. This volume starts off with the same explanatory poem as Runny Babbit: A Billy Sook (2005): “Way down in the green woods / Where the animals all play, / They do things and say things / In a different sort of way— / Instead of sayin’ ‘purple hat,’ / They all say ‘hurple pat.’ ” Runny “Snoes Gorkeling” and loses his “trimming swunks.” He rides a “coller roaster” at the “founty cair” and loses his lunch. He meets Santa Claus and an evil witch —er, “wevil itch.” He eats soup, celebrates his birthday, and finds a dinosaur egg. Each poem is accompanied by one of Silverstein’s scratchy line drawings, each matching perfectly. In many of the drawings, the denizens of the green woods speak in their own spoonerisms. Though these poems did not make the first collection, which Silverstein had been working on for years before his death, they do not feel second-rate. They echo all that readers loved and all that made them laugh in Uncle Shelby’s work.

Cead with rare and lave a good haugh; there can’t be too many more like these. (Poetry. 6-12)

Pub Date: Sept. 19, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-06-247939-6

Page Count: 96

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: July 17, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2017

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A beautifully told and illustrated story that offers a unique perspective on both war and humanity

THE CAT MAN OF ALEPPO

When the war comes to Syria, many flee, but Alaa stays in his beloved city, Aleppo, where he continues to work as an ambulance driver and helps the wounded to safety.

Day after day, he misses his family and friends who have left, wondering where they are and how they are doing. His neighborhood empties—except for cats! However, these cats are affected by the conflict too; they’re left behind with shelters destroyed and food and water stringently limited. Alaa, who has a big heart, starts taking care of them using the little money he has. The love between man and cats multiplies, and many people from around the world step up to help. Soon, the cats of Aleppo get a pleasant shelter set in a courtyard. However, Alaa does not stop there and goes on to help other animals and more people, spreading joy, love, and hope. Based on a true story, this picture book is distinctive for its engaging narrative and impeccable illustrations. It is also enriched with notes from Alaa himself (the real one) as well as the authors and illustrator. The often-dramatic images offer a glimpse of the city prior to the conflict and a window on the real people who experience war and try to survive and help others around them.

A beautifully told and illustrated story that offers a unique perspective on both war and humanity . (Picture book. 6-9)

Pub Date: April 14, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9848-1378-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: Jan. 12, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2020

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An incredible connector text for young readers eager to graduate to weighty conversations about our yesterday, our now, and...

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THE UNDEFEATED

Past and present are quilted together in this innovative overview of black Americans’ triumphs and challenges in the United States.

Alexander’s poetry possesses a straightforward, sophisticated, steady rhythm that, paired with Nelson’s detail-oriented oil paintings, carries readers through generations chronicling “the unforgettable,” “the undeniable,” “the unflappable,” and “the righteous marching ones,” alongside “the unspeakable” events that shape the history of black Americans. The illustrator layers images of black creators, martyrs, athletes, and neighbors onto blank white pages, patterns pages with the bodies of slaves stolen and traded, and extends a memorial to victims of police brutality like Sandra Bland and Michael Brown past the very edges of a double-page spread. Each movement of Alexander’s poem is a tribute to the ingenuity and resilience of black people in the U.S., with textual references to the writings of Gwendolyn Brooks, Martin Luther King Jr., Langston Hughes, and Malcolm X dotting stanzas in explicit recognition and grateful admiration. The book ends with a glossary of the figures acknowledged in the book and an afterword by the author that imprints the refrain “Black. Lives. Matter” into the collective soul of readers, encouraging them, like the cranes present throughout the book, to “keep rising.”

An incredible connector text for young readers eager to graduate to weighty conversations about our yesterday, our now, and our tomorrow. (Picture book/poetry. 6-12)

Pub Date: April 2, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-328-78096-6

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Versify/HMH

Review Posted Online: Jan. 15, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2019

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