A touching, if problematic, testament to the power of faith in a time of trial.

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THE CULTURE OF HOPE FOUNDED ON FAITH

A memoir of Christian faith that focuses on a family crisis.

Merritt (The Gift of Seeing Angels and Demons, 2016) opens this nonfiction work with an account of a personal tragedy: her husband Dan’s 2006 diagnosis of mantle-cell lymphoma, a rare form of cancer with a grim prognosis and a low survival rate. Thus began what she refers to as “our journey into cancer-land,” in which her faith was tested and refined as her husband dealt with medication issues, weakness, chemotherapy, and other difficult aspects of aggressive cancer treatment. She and her husband and their friends struggled with maintaining a “continual attitude of gratitude,” which she identifies at length as the central core of the Christian life—a patient thankfulness that sometimes sits uncomfortably alongside the worry and urgency of serious illness. As long as we live, Merritt tells readers, “God continues to work in and through us to bring us to the point of readiness to step into His presence.” This tone of humble trust will have an immediate appeal to fundamentalist Christian readers. However, some other aspects of the text may cause problems for some readers. For example, the book asserts that “God’s timing was perfect” when he caused the drug Rituxan to be approved in the same month that Dan was diagnosed; however, it doesn’t discuss why other, earlier cancer patients weren’t allowed access to the same drug. Also, it doesn’t address the fact that, despite numerous scientific studies, it’s never been conclusively proven that faith and health are linked. Finally, the author tends to attribute numerous other events to God’s direct intervention—such as the family’s decision to change churches or the fact that a trap caught a mouse in her kitchen—which will seem like overreach to some readers.

A touching, if problematic, testament to the power of faith in a time of trial.

Pub Date: May 4, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-5127-8424-4

Page Count: 184

Publisher: Westbow Press

Review Posted Online: Aug. 17, 2017

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If the authors are serious, this is a silly, distasteful book. If they are not, it’s a brilliant satire.

THE 48 LAWS OF POWER

The authors have created a sort of anti-Book of Virtues in this encyclopedic compendium of the ways and means of power.

Everyone wants power and everyone is in a constant duplicitous game to gain more power at the expense of others, according to Greene, a screenwriter and former editor at Esquire (Elffers, a book packager, designed the volume, with its attractive marginalia). We live today as courtiers once did in royal courts: we must appear civil while attempting to crush all those around us. This power game can be played well or poorly, and in these 48 laws culled from the history and wisdom of the world’s greatest power players are the rules that must be followed to win. These laws boil down to being as ruthless, selfish, manipulative, and deceitful as possible. Each law, however, gets its own chapter: “Conceal Your Intentions,” “Always Say Less Than Necessary,” “Pose as a Friend, Work as a Spy,” and so on. Each chapter is conveniently broken down into sections on what happened to those who transgressed or observed the particular law, the key elements in this law, and ways to defensively reverse this law when it’s used against you. Quotations in the margins amplify the lesson being taught. While compelling in the way an auto accident might be, the book is simply nonsense. Rules often contradict each other. We are told, for instance, to “be conspicuous at all cost,” then told to “behave like others.” More seriously, Greene never really defines “power,” and he merely asserts, rather than offers evidence for, the Hobbesian world of all against all in which he insists we live. The world may be like this at times, but often it isn’t. To ask why this is so would be a far more useful project.

If the authors are serious, this is a silly, distasteful book. If they are not, it’s a brilliant satire.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1998

ISBN: 0-670-88146-5

Page Count: 430

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 1998

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DEAR MR. HENSHAW

Possibly inspired by the letters Cleary has received as a children's author, this begins with second-grader Leigh Botts' misspelled fan letter to Mr. Henshaw, whose fictitious book itself derives from the old take-off title Forty Ways W. Amuse a Dog. Soon Leigh is in sixth grade and bombarding his still-favorite author with a list of questions to be answered and returned by "next Friday," the day his author report is due. Leigh is disgruntled when Mr. Henshaw's answer comes late, and accompanied by a set of questions for Leigh to answer. He threatens not to, but as "Mom keeps nagging me about your dumb old questions" he finally gets the job done—and through his answers Mr. Henshaw and readers learn that Leigh considers himself "the mediumest boy in school," that his parents have split up, and that he dreams of his truck-driver dad driving him to school "hauling a forty-foot reefer, which would make his outfit add up to eighteen wheels altogether. . . . I guess I wouldn't seem so medium then." Soon Mr. Henshaw recommends keeping a diary (at least partly to get Leigh off his own back) and so the real letters to Mr. Henshaw taper off, with "pretend," unmailed letters (the diary) taking over. . . until Leigh can write "I don't have to pretend to write to Mr. Henshaw anymore. I have learned to say what I think on a piece of paper." Meanwhile Mr. Henshaw offers writing tips, and Leigh, struggling with a story for a school contest, concludes "I think you're right. Maybe I am not ready to write a story." Instead he writes a "true story" about a truck haul with his father in Leigh's real past, and this wins praise from "a real live author" Leigh meets through the school program. Mr. Henshaw has also advised that "a character in a story should solve a problem or change in some way," a standard juvenile-fiction dictum which Cleary herself applies modestly by having Leigh solve his disappearing lunch problem with a burglar-alarmed lunch box—and, more seriously, come to recognize and accept that his father can't be counted on. All of this, in Leigh's simple words, is capably and unobtrusively structured as well as valid and realistic. From the writing tips to the divorced-kid blues, however, it tends to substitute prevailing wisdom for the little jolts of recognition that made the Ramona books so rewarding.

Pub Date: Aug. 22, 1983

ISBN: 143511096X

Page Count: 133

Publisher: Morrow/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Oct. 16, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1983

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