It’s easy to smell a storytime hit, thanks to the combination of unvarnished doggerel and poop in literally astronomical...

THE DINOSAUR THAT POOPED A PLANET!

When Danny takes his voracious pet dinosaur into space but forgets to bring lunch, there’s only one way to get back home.

Soaring into orbit aboard a rocket stolen from the science museum, Danny’s all set for an exciting adventure. Unfortunately, the lack of provisions soon has his humongous companion not only chowing down on the control boards, but sallying out to chomp on the moon, Martian passers-by, “satellites, Saturn, and six supernovas, / Shape-shifting saucers and seven space rovers,” until at last even the spacecraft itself has gone down the hatch. How to get back to Earth? Dino to the rescue: “With the feeling of guilt deep down in its gut, / Its brain brewed a plan involving its butt.” Propelled by a massive diarrheic stream that looks in the cartoon illustrations like golden cake batter studded with partially digested science gear, off rockets the white lad perched aboard his bulbous buddy…leaving behind a new, brown companion for the moon. Fletcher, Poynter, and Parsons gleefully and unapologetically play to the lowest possible common denominator, from concept to limping verse and (adult) stomach-turning visuals.

It’s easy to smell a storytime hit, thanks to the combination of unvarnished doggerel and poop in literally astronomical quantities. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Sept. 5, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4814-9866-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Aladdin

Review Posted Online: May 10, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2017

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PIRATES DON'T TAKE BATHS

Echoes of Runaway Bunny color this exchange between a bath-averse piglet and his patient mother. Using a strategy that would probably be a nonstarter in real life, the mother deflects her stubborn offspring’s string of bath-free occupational conceits with appeals to reason: “Pirates NEVER EVER take baths!” “Pirates don’t get seasick either. But you do.” “Yeesh. I’m an astronaut, okay?” “Well, it is hard to bathe in zero gravity. It’s hard to poop and pee in zero gravity too!” And so on, until Mom’s enticing promise of treasure in the deep sea persuades her little Treasure Hunter to take a dive. Chunky figures surrounded by lots of bright white space in Segal’s minimally detailed watercolors keep the visuals as simple as the plotline. The language isn’t quite as basic, though, and as it rendered entirely in dialogue—Mother Pig’s lines are italicized—adult readers will have to work hard at their vocal characterizations for it to make any sense. Moreover, younger audiences (any audiences, come to that) may wonder what the piggy’s watery closing “EUREKA!!!” is all about too. Not particularly persuasive, but this might coax a few young porkers to get their trotters into the tub. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: March 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-0-399-25425-3

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Philomel

Review Posted Online: Jan. 26, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2011

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An interesting premise but the execution is underwhelming.

STELLA KEEPS THE SUN UP

Stella hates going to bed, so she and her best buddy attempt to prevent the sun from setting.

Imaginative Stella, a young Black girl with Afro puffs, misses her friend Kamrynn, a light-skinned, straight-haired girl who has moved to “the other side of the world.” Luckily, Stella still has her best pal Roger, a blue hippo stuffie. Neither Stella nor Roger like sleeping: “Why do we have to miss all the fun and go to bed just because it gets dark?” Deciding that “if it never gets dark, then we can stay awake forever,” the duo work tirelessly to “keep the sun awake.” They play loud music, shine flashlights at the sun, and even make various attempts to launch a cup of coffee up to the celestial orb in hopes that caffeine will keep it alert. Eventually, the pair quit when they realize that if the sun never sets for them, morning can never come for Kamrynn, who wakes up when they go to bed. Despite the book’s sweet touches, the narrative is weakened by some meandering irrelevancies that make the plot feel disconnected. Also, at the beginning of the story, Stella seems enamored of the moon—she wishes she could jump high enough to kiss it—yet she and Roger spend the bulk of the book trying to prevent nightfall; this discrepancy may give some readers pause. The digital, cartoonlike illustrations are bright, colorful, and cheerful but don’t make up for the shaky plotting.

An interesting premise but the execution is underwhelming. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: March 8, 2022

ISBN: 978-1-5344-8785-7

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Denene Millner Books/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: Jan. 12, 2022

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2022

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