CITIES OF EMPIRE by Tristram Hunt
Kirkus Star

CITIES OF EMPIRE

The British Colonies and the Creation of the Urban World
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Ten vibrant cities across the globe tell the story of British imperialism in terms more nuanced and complicated than simply being good or bad.

British historian and Labour Party education spokesman Hunt (History/Univ. of London; Marx's General: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels, 2009, etc.) finds Niall Ferguson’s Empire: How Britain Made the Modern World (2003) too focused on the “heroic age of Victorian achievement.” Hunt offers a broader, more inclusive approach to the history of British imperial ambition through the evolving institutions, architecture, economies and mores of the empire’s far-flung transplanted urbanism, from the 17th century to today. Most of the cities are ports (save New Delhi) and evolved from specific strategic and financial exigencies on the British empire at a specific point in time: Bustling Boston represented the maritime empire’s more “benign and flexible connotations” (until the Revolution); Bridgetown, Barbados, avidly promoted the export economy through sugar production and the slave trade, allowing the wealthy plantocracy to stock their houses with all manner of fancy British goods. In the 1780s and ’90s, Dublin symbolized the enthusiasm for a unifying colonial relationship, however directed by a “narrow urban elite.” Cape Town, wrested from the Dutch, offered by its wondrous geography an imperial supremacy after the Seven Years’ War, while Calcutta symbolized “a colonial citadel which cemented Britain’s ‘Swing to the East.’ ” Hunt takes great pains to underscore the important, changeable relationship between settlers and the indigenous peoples. For example, in Melbourne in the late 19th century, the Aborigines were deemed too backward for “redemption” and thus were excluded from discussions on how to govern the colony. In moneymaking Bombay, the symbol of Britain’s capacity for technological and administrative progress, the multiethnic residents played an enormous role in creating the urban landscape. Throughout the book, Hunt ably demonstrates how these cities and their colonizations contributed to the development of urbanism.

A well-documented, evenhanded work that will delight urban scholars and lay travelers.

Pub Date: Nov. 25th, 2014
ISBN: 978-0805093087
Page count: 544pp
Publisher: Metropolitan/Henry Holt
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15th, 2014




BEST HISTORY BOOKS OF 2014:

NonfictionENCOUNTERS AT THE HEART OF THE WORLD by Elizabeth A. Fenn
by Elizabeth A. Fenn
NonfictionASTORIA by Peter Stark
by Peter Stark
NonfictionWAR! WHAT IS IT GOOD FOR? by Ian Morris
by Ian Morris
NonfictionDARK INVASION by Howard Blum
by Howard Blum

MORE BY TRISTRAM HUNT

NonfictionMARX’S GENERAL by Tristram Hunt
by Tristram Hunt
NonfictionBUILDING JERUSALEM by Tristram Hunt
by Tristram Hunt

SIMILAR BOOKS SUGGESTED BY OUR CRITICS:

NonfictionSHANTYTOWN, USA by Lisa Goff
by Lisa Goff
NonfictionTALES OF TWO CITIES by Jonathan  Conlin
by Jonathan Conlin
NonfictionCITIES by John Reader
by John Reader