Throughout the alarums and excursions, the low-maintenance heroine maintains a composure that should serve her well in the...

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A HOUSE OF GHOSTS

Ryan, best known as William Ryan for his three historical novels about Moscow police captain Alexei Korolev (The Twelfth Department, 2013, etc.), goes back even further in time for some homefront intrigue in 1917 England.

The ostensible reason the Secret Intelligence Service sends Capt. Robert Donovan (not his real name) down to Blackwater Island, off the Devon coast, is to protect Lord Francis Highmount and his Austrian-born wife, Lady Elizabeth Highmount, during what looks like a fraught weekend party. The SIS doesn’t bother to give a reason why Donovan should be joined by Naval Intelligence codebreaker Kate Cartwright. The guests providing cover for Kate, who’d already turned down an invitation to the gathering, include her titled parents and Capt. Rolleston Miller-White, a plausible scoundrel to whom she was once engaged. The most important skill Kate brings to the party is one she’s kept secret: She can see spirits. That makes her an ideal person to test the claims of Madame Feda and Count Orlov, a pair of mediums taken up by Lady Elizabeth, who hopes to get into contact with the sons who haven’t returned from the war. Algernon Highmount is missing, presumed dead; there’s no doubt at all that his brother Reginald, Kate’s late fiance, was killed. Once the island is duly isolated from the mainland by bad weather and deliberate sabotage, Ryan pulls out all the stops. Blackwater Abbey, “built on a graveyard,” features bloodstained staircases, secret passages, and all the nooks and crannies needed to keep the dozen guests and residents from providing solid alibis to each other when one of them is murdered. There’ll be séances, unmaskings, things that go bump in the night, voices from beyond the grave, and revelations of several different characters’ unsuspectedly dark connections to the Great War.

Throughout the alarums and excursions, the low-maintenance heroine maintains a composure that should serve her well in the promised series.

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-948924-71-9

Page Count: 384

Publisher: Arcade

Review Posted Online: July 15, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2019

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Though gripping, even moving at times, the novel doesn’t do justice to the solemn history from which it is drawn.

CILKA'S JOURNEY

In this follow-up to the widely read The Tattooist of Auschwitz (2018), a young concentration camp survivor is sentenced to 15 years’ hard labor in a Russian gulag.

The novel begins with the liberation of Auschwitz by Soviet troops in 1945. In the camp, 16-year-old Cecilia "Cilka" Klein—one of the Jewish prisoners introduced in Tattooist—was forced to become the mistress of two Nazi commandants. The Russians accuse her of collaborating—they also think she might be a spy—and send her to the Vorkuta Gulag in Siberia. There, another nightmarish scenario unfolds: Cilka, now 18, and the other women in her hut are routinely raped at night by criminal-class prisoners with special “privileges”; by day, the near-starving women haul coal from the local mines in frigid weather. The narrative is intercut with Cilka’s grim memories of Auschwitz as well as her happier recollections of life with her parents and sister before the war. At Vorkuta, her lot improves when she starts work as a nurse trainee at the camp hospital under the supervision of a sympathetic woman doctor who tries to protect her. Cilka also begins to feel the stirrings of romantic love for Alexandr, a fellow prisoner. Though believing she is cursed, Cilka shows great courage and fortitude throughout: Indeed, her ability to endure trauma—as well her heroism in ministering to the sick and wounded—almost defies credulity. The novel is ostensibly based on a true story, but a central element in the book—Cilka’s sexual relationship with the SS officers—has been challenged by the Auschwitz Memorial Research Center and by the real Cilka’s stepson, who says it is false. As in Tattooist, the writing itself is workmanlike at best and often overwrought.

Though gripping, even moving at times, the novel doesn’t do justice to the solemn history from which it is drawn.

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-250-26570-8

Page Count: 352

Publisher: St. Martin's

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2019

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Forget about solving all these crimes; the signal triumph here is (spoiler) the heroine’s survival.

A CONSPIRACY OF BONES

Another sweltering month in Charlotte, another boatload of mysteries past and present for overworked, overstressed forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan.

A week after the night she chases but fails to catch a mysterious trespasser outside her town house, some unknown party texts Tempe four images of a corpse that looks as if it’s been chewed by wild hogs, because it has been. Showboat Medical Examiner Margot Heavner makes it clear that, breaking with her department’s earlier practice (The Bone Collection, 2016, etc.), she has no intention of calling in Tempe as a consultant and promptly identifies the faceless body herself as that of a young Asian man. Nettled by several errors in Heavner’s analysis, and even more by her willingness to share the gory details at a press conference, Tempe launches her own investigation, which is not so much off the books as against the books. Heavner isn’t exactly mollified when Tempe, aided by retired police detective Skinny Slidell and a host of experts, puts a name to the dead man. But the hints of other crimes Tempe’s identification uncovers, particularly crimes against children, spur her on to redouble her efforts despite the new M.E.’s splenetic outbursts. Before he died, it seems, Felix Vodyanov was linked to a passenger ferry that sank in 1994, an even earlier U.S. government project to research biological agents that could control human behavior, the hinky spiritual retreat Sparkling Waters, the dark web site DeepUnder, and the disappearances of at least four schoolchildren, two of whom have also turned up dead. And why on earth was Vodyanov carrying Tempe’s own contact information? The mounting evidence of ever more and ever worse skulduggery will pull Tempe deeper and deeper down what even she sees as a rabbit hole before she confronts a ringleader implicated in “Drugs. Fraud. Breaking and entering. Arson. Kidnapping. How does attempted murder sound?”

Forget about solving all these crimes; the signal triumph here is (spoiler) the heroine’s survival.

Pub Date: March 17, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9821-3888-2

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Scribner

Review Posted Online: Dec. 23, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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