Books by Nick Sharratt

WHOSE TOES ARE THOSE? by Sally Symes
Released: Dec. 11, 2012

"A playful, predictable experience for lift-the-flap lovers. (Board book. 18 mos.-3)"
Symes and Sharratt, who delighted little ones in Yawn (2011), pair up once again for more board-book fun. Read full book review >
YAWN by Sally Symes
Kirkus Star
by Sally Symes, illustrated by Nick Sharratt
Released: Dec. 1, 2011

"With such an enthusiastic call to participate, Wynken, Blynken and Nod stand no chance here. (Board book. 1-4)"
From one tired tot through an impressive array of animals, a mighty yawn passes along. Read full book review >
WHAT'S IN THE WITCH'S KITCHEN? by Nick Sharratt
FANTASY
Released: July 12, 2011

"Sharratt's interactive rhyming fun one-on-one. (Picture book. 3-5)"
The title beckons readers into the dark house pictured on the cover. Read full book review >
COOKIE by Jacqueline Wilson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Sharratt's trademark illustrations lend their own kind of comfort by giving a quick graphic preview of what's to come in each chapter. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Beauty Cookson's father, Gerry, a scheming, status-conscious real-estate developer, is unpredictable and controlling at home. Read full book review >
BLOOD AND GOO AND BOOGERS TOO! by Steve Alton
HEALTH
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"Awesome. (Informational pop-up. 5-10)"
You just know a book with an ooey-gooey touch-and-feel booger on the cover has got to be good, and this gleefully gross pop-up doesn't disappoint. Read full book review >
THE FOGGY, FOGGY FOREST by Nick Sharratt
FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2008

"A nifty notion well played. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Sharratt is not the first illustrator to use vellum to create a sense of mist on the page, but he may be one of the first to capitalize on its peek-a-book effect with a younger audience. Read full book review >
BEST FRIENDS by Jacqueline Wilson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"Gemma's dilemmas—crying jags, chocolate binges, cake-throwing, special dolls and bracelets and birthday wishes—are sprinkled with British idioms; this will cause no problems for American readers, who will be grinning all the while. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Gemma and Alice have been best friends from the day they were born. Read full book review >
CANDYFLOSS by Jacqueline Wilson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"British idioms outlined in 'Floss's Glossary.' (Fiction. 10-14)"
Flora (Floss) Barnes shuttles back and forth between Dad and Mum, Steve and half-brother Tiger. Read full book review >
WHEN A MONSTER IS BORN by Sean Taylor
FANTASY
Released: June 1, 2007

"Multiple typefaces will aid even the clumsiest readers in making this a storytime staple. (Picture book. 2-5)"
In the fine tradition of Laura Numeroff's If You Give a Mouse a Cookie (1985) and Remy Charlip's Fortunately (1980) comes this British import sure to have little monsters everywhere asking to hear it again. Read full book review >
EAT YOUR PEAS by Kes Gray
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 2006

"A Bunch of Daisies), first published in England in 2000. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Frazzled mom and determined daughter face off in an escalating battle of wills—and legumes. Read full book review >
MIXED UP FAIRY TALES by Hilary Robinson
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 15, 2005

"A hoot. (Picture book/folktales. 5-8)"
A four part, split page format turns a dozen or so familiar folktales into thousands, as children can mix or match the parts at will to make silly, sometimes loaded versions: "Ali Baba . . . put on a bright red cape . . . and dreamt about marrying . . . the Marquis of Carabas." Read full book review >
SHARK IN THE PARK! by Nick Sharratt
ANIMALS
Released: June 11, 2002

"And although the premise is tried and true, Sharratt's design is fresh and fun. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Cartoon-bright colors saturate lively spreads in Sharratt's (Eat Your Peas, 2000, etc.) clever offering. Read full book review >
SPIDER STORCH, ROTTEN RUNNER by Gina Willner-Pardo
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"The writing is funny and fast-paced and the comical cartoon illustrations and a side story about the mysterious teacher's lounge make this a wonderful addition to the Spider Storch series. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Joey "Spider" Storch hates to be wrong, but his friends are getting tired of hanging out with a know-it-all. Read full book review >
VICKY ANGEL by Jacqueline Wilson
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"What makes this story successful are its honest characters and dialogue, its unique coverage of grief, and its ability to unite readers with Jade's healing process. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Jade and Vicky are best friends, "closer than sisters," and although the cover openly reveals Vicky's death, it does not prepare readers for Jade's intense reactions. Read full book review >
THE STORY OF TRACY BEAKER by Jacqueline Wilson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 14, 2001

"By the end, Cam has still not come around—but readers may be too annoyed by Tracy's rude, aggressive character to care. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Wilson pushes so much pain between the lines of this portrait of a foster child with the personality of a steamroller that it comes off less a lightweight tribute to human resilience than a pathos-ridden tale of children acting out as they nurse profound inner wounds. Read full book review >
BAD GIRLS by Jacqueline Wilson
FICTION
Released: Feb. 13, 2001

"Youngsters will have a jolly good time with these bad, no, great girls in a read that's fun though sometimes implausible. (Fiction. 9-12)"
The protagonists in this English import by the author of The Lottie Project (1999)—and other books about funny, feisty girls—aren't the bad girls of the title. Read full book review >
EAT YOUR PEAS by Kes Gray
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"While this may not convert any readers into avid pea fans, the underlying message that everyone has individual tastes should help to diffuse dinnertime tensions. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A child's staunch refusal to eat her peas and her mother's elaborate enticement is the basis for this zany but telling tale. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 1, 2000

"It's a witty lesson, especially with the infusion of the cautionary element and the sense of time it imparts. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Both the devilry of Tom and the clever inclusion of the consequences of his act invest this story with real charm and make the attending lesson in time most palatable. Read full book review >
DOUBLE ACT by Jacqueline Wilson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1998

"Their alternating accountsRuby's long and chatty, Garnet's short but eloquentare illustrated with simple black-and-white drawings, each twin done by a different artist, to no distinguishable effect. (Fiction. 9-11)"
From Wilson (The Suitcase Kid, 1997, etc.), a lightweight British import that is a telling study of twindom's trials and tribulations. Read full book review >
SPIDER STORCH'S TEACHER TORTURE by Gina Willner-Pardo
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The most interesting twist—Spider's changes to a recipe for a dish that Mary Grace's divorced mother plans to serve to a possible love interest—has the potential for humor, but even that is dissolved when he prematurely confesses. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Joey Storch, otherwise known as Spider, is not happy when his mother becomes friends with the mother of his third-grade classroom nemesis, the tattle-tale Mary Grace; he is horrified when the two mothers decide to carpool to school. Read full book review >
KETCHUP ON YOUR CORNFLAKES? by Nick Sharratt
FOOD & COOKING
Released: May 1, 1997

"Probably not, but the subtext is clever: Eating and reading are adventures—go for it. (Picture book. 2-5)"
This amusing book gives children a chance to play with their food without being reprimanded and without making a mess. Read full book review >
ELSA, STAR OF THE SHELTER! by Jacqueline Wilson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"Sharratt's black-and-white drawings—stick figures, silly asides, etc.—give this the feel of a child's journal but also make it difficult to take Elsa's very real travails seriously. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Elsa, narrator and aspiring comedienne, is growing up below the poverty line in England. Read full book review >
TASTY POEMS by Jill Bennett
edited by Jill Bennett, illustrated by Nick Sharratt
POETRY
Released: Nov. 8, 1992

"With its high- interest text and illustrations, a good choice for beginning readers. (Poetry/Picture book. 6-9)"
Twelve brief, fairly contemporary entries about food and eating, from the US (Prelutsky, Leland Jacobs), Britain, and the Caribbean (John Agard). Read full book review >