Book List

Children's Songs & Music

¡MUU, MOO!

RIMAS DE ANIMALES/ANIMAL NURSERY RHYMES

Ada and Campoy team up again (¡Pío Peep!, 2003, etc.) to produce this lovely anthology of rhymes, songs and poems from the Hispanic oral tradition. The selection is focused on popular verses with animal themes, which plays naturally to the interests of young ones and will make parents and grandparents recollect their own childhoods. Some of the poems are very simple and create enjoyment just by the repetition of a syllable: “Debajo de un botón, ton ton, / que encontró Martín, tin tin / había un ratón, ton, ton…” Others are more complex and tell a story, presented as a dramatic piece, such as “Las bodas de la pulga y el piojo/The Flea’s Wedding.” The collection is enriched by the inclusion of some verses written by the authors, inspired by the repetition and form of the genre. Zubizarreta’s musical English renditions of the rhymes increase the uses of this collection, making it a valuable bilingual resource. Escrivá’s depictions of children and the animals’ humorous expressions infuse each page with an infectious, childlike happiness. (Nursery rhymes. 1-7)

Pub Date: March 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-06-134613-2

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Rayo/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Dec. 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2010

GOBBLE IT UP!

A FUN SONG ABOUT EATING!

“You’d gobble them up and they’d taste good” is the repeated line in this jaunty song about animal feeding that invites young children into the natural world. Raccoons, crocodiles, sharks, whales and pandas appear in their natural habitats, chowing down on crawdads, ducklings, fish, squid and bamboo. Arnosky’s characteristically detailed watercolors add information; they are accurate as well as appealing. The whale illustrated is a sperm whale, the giant squid’s only predator. The shark shares its shallow-water habitat with a pelican, and bats fly where the raccoon hunts by night. A rare lapse into personification that has the crocodile fooling ducklings with a smile can be forgiven in light of the charm of the rhythmic text and easy-to-sing melody for preschool listeners. The real strength of this offering is its clear-eyed look at nature red in tooth and claw; preschoolers who have sent zillions of monkeys into the maw of Mr. Alligator will understand this. A CD with Arnosky playing the guitar and singing his song is part of the package. (Informational picture book. 3-7)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-439-90362-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2008

LET IT SHINE

THREE FAVORITE SPIRITUALS

An extra-large trim size, a vibrant palette and Bryan’s glorious cut-paper collage illustrations add up to a marvelous interpretation of three traditional African-American spirituals: “This Little Light of Mine,” “Oh, When the Saints Go Marching In” and “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands.” Intriguing endpapers show larger-than-life hands set against flowing stripes of color, with scissors and cut-paper shapes hinting at the arresting artistic style within. Children in silhouette are the main design element for the first two songs, with the final song illustrated with remarkable images of huge hands holding up different elements of the world. The volume’s large size and brilliant colors make this a natural choice for a rousing sing-along with a group, and the musical notation for the songs is included. Incorporated into these final spreads with the music are concluding illustrations for every song, each focusing on a shining source of light. (Nonfiction. 3-8)

Pub Date: Jan. 9, 2007

ISBN: 0-689-84732-7

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Atheneum

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2006

FOREVER YOUNG

Rogers sets Dylan’s timeless lyric (composed, writes the renowned author, “in a minute”) to simply drawn and colored cartoon scenes strewn with references to iconic ’60s-era people and places, as well as Dylan songs and albums. The result is a keepsake of the period that will nonetheless speak to modern readers. The archetypal plot follows an eager lad who takes the guitar passed to him by a smiling busker outside Gerde’s Folk City, and at the end passes the instrument in turn to an even younger girl. In between, he sings in the park for the likes of Joan Baez, zooms down Highway 61 in a VW beetle and marches beneath antiwar signs with Martin Luther King Jr. and others. The illustrator provides a partial key at the end, along with the occasional musical recommendation. Modern songs don’t generally make the leap to this format successfully—Dylan’s own Man Gave Names to All the Animals (1999), illustrated by Scott Menchin, being a case in point—but here’s a rare exception. (Picture book. 6-8, Boomers)

Pub Date: Sept. 23, 2008

ISBN: 978-1-4169-5808-6

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Atheneum

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2008

MAN GAVE NAMES TO ALL THE ANIMALS

For this book-and-CD set, prolific artist and naturalist Arnosky has illustrated Dylan's catchy song about man naming animals—bear, cow, bull, pig, sheep and snake—with pencil-and-acrylic paintings of more than 170 animals in a series of peaceable kingdom images. Each double-page spread includes a number of identifiable animals in an imagined natural setting. An alphabetical list of most animals pictured is provided at the end. There are curious choices: three specific types of monkeys, for instance, but only a generic snake. The cow, bull, pig and sheep of the song have been shown in ancestral forms, an appropriate and evocative choice, though probably unfamiliar to young readers. They may also be frustrated by the lack of a key to the unnumbered pages in the book. Adults who share this with children may want to print out the keys from Arnosky's website, which should be complete by publication. The different illustrations on the dust cover and printed boards require libraries to make a choice. A beautiful concept with gorgeous artwork but flawed design. (Picture book and CD. 3-10)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-1-4027-6858-3

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Sterling

Review Posted Online: July 21, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2010

SHE’LL BE COMING ’ROUND THE MOUNTAIN

Sing along, dance along and follow the adventures of rootin’ tootin’ frontier Babe. After a short introduction, the text swings into multiple verses of the title tune. Who knew there were so many? “She’ll dance across the rooftops” and “she’ll paint the whole town purple” are just two. Each verse also has its own fun exclamation for listeners to shout out or sing, from “Toot-Toot!” to “Tee-Hee!” to “Squish-Splat!” Backmatter even includes pictured instructions on how to perform each exclamation. (For “Squish-Splat,” you imagine juggling jelly with both hands.) Another surprise is a pair of giant saloon-door pages that open out to reveal Babe and all of her partying friends waiting to come in. Dancing type adds energy to Emmett’s Wild West hokey pokey, as do Allwright’s lively illustrations full of dancing, jiggling chickens, prairie dogs, owls and, of course, kids. Yee-Ha! (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: April 10, 2007

ISBN: 1-4169-3652-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Atheneum

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2007

JAZZ FLY 2

THE JUNGLE PACHANGA

Jazz Fly and his band are back (The Jazz Fly, 2000) for a bilingual adventure: a tropical-rainforest gig plus car trouble. Using his “Jazz-Spanish” phrase book, he enlists a sleepy sloth, a hyperactive monkey and an obliging macaw, alighting at the Termite Nook in time. His quartet’s grooves are interrupted dramatically when an anteater literally crashes the party. A message—a second language enriches life—is overplayed, but the cross-cultural interplay of scat and Latin rhythms wins out. A funkified layer of elementary science, delivered winkingly, adds a soupçon of cool. “On till dawn, the two bands played. Larvae danced. A thousand eggs were laid.” The accompanying CD is positively integral: Gollub’s band’s Latin jazz arrangements are—unusual for children’s music—actually tight. The narration’s occasionally shrill, but Gollub’s iteration of the chorus (“CHOO-ka CHOO-ka TING. ¡Ay, caramba! ¿Cómo cómo llego a la CHOO-ka pachanga?”) is required hearing for anyone aspiring to read this text aloud (which is a must). Hanke supplies breezy, computer-enhanced illustrations, delivering swarming details from diaphanous wings to pools of ambient lighting to bug eyes extraordinaire. ¡Qué bueno! (author’s note) (Picture book/CD. 5-8)  

Pub Date: June 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-1-889910-44-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Tortuga Press

Review Posted Online: June 3, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2010

MOTHER’S SONG

A LULLABY

Greene, respected folklorist, storyteller and early-childhood expert, revives a 19th-century English nursery love song originally penned by the Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould in 1895. In that magical place between awake and asleep, and with the assistance of friendly fauna, flora and fairies, a mother waxes rhapsodic on the love she bears her baby. “There’s not a rose where e’er I seek / As comely as my baby’s cheek.” Sayles’s illustrations are reminiscent of children’s-book art of yesteryear—lush, large-scale powdery pastel paintings, washed with dusky lavenders, peaches and greens. There is a lovely harmony between the visual and verbal elements here, making this a sibilant, sentimental mood piece, particularly appropriate for new mothers. An erudite author’s note reveals the poetic pedigree and a musical notation is appended, the better to sing the refrain: “And it’s O! sweet, sweet! and a lullaby.” Readers will have to decide for themselves whether this one is archaic or timeless. (Picture book. 0-3)

Pub Date: March 17, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-618-71527-7

Page Count: 28

Publisher: Clarion

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2008

WHAT WILL WE DO WITH THE BABY-O?

This collection of ten rhymes and songs manages to group some traditional favorites such as Trot Trot to Boston and Hush Little Baby with more modern folk songs like Woodie Guthrie’s Jig Along Home. Simple graphics rendered in a vibrant palette feature a family of five enjoying their day from morning coffee and horsey rides to bath time and bed. Cartoon-like, they feature big bright eyes—often opened really wide; little spots for mouths—unless formed in a huge smile; upturned noses shaped like an upside-down u; and pink polka-dotted spots for cheeks. Accompanying each rhyme are suggestions for hand or body movements that can enhance playtime with baby and music for most of the selections follows at the end. A unique grouping of rhymes and bold illustrations make this selection a standout. There will be no question about what to do with baby with this collection around. Lively, toe-tapping fun. (Picture book. 2-4)

Pub Date: Nov. 2, 2004

ISBN: 0-88776-689-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Tundra

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2004

LET THERE BE PEACE ON EARTH

AND LET IT BEGIN WITH ME

A popular peace anthem makes its picture-book debut, with simple lyrics celebrating the hope for a better world. In 1955, a group of 180 teenagers linked arms and hearts and sang this song. It has since been recorded by numerous artists, strummed around campfires and used as a theme for UNICEF. In radiant, familiar Diaz style, peace symbols from around the world illuminate the text. Glowing white doves settle next to curling tufts of grass, while fiery red cranes fly overhead. Teaching world peace is inarguably worthwhile. But the purpose of this song isn’t to explain peace; instead, it is a call to individual action. The words “let it begin with me” are powerful—even children can do their part. Will the song resonate as much with young readers as it did with the original teenagers who first banded together? Likely not. But kids play a vital role in changing this world. The more quickly they learn that everyone can make a difference, the better. (CD, sheet music, history of song and composers, list of peace symbols) (Picture book. 7-10)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2009

ISBN: 978-1-58246-285-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Tricycle

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2009

LIFT EVERY VOICE AND SING

A PICTORAL TRIBUTE TO THE NEGRO NATIONAL ANTHEM

Celebrating the centenary of the song frequently dubbed “The Negro National Anthem,” this matches those stirring lyrics to equally heartfelt black-and-white photos. Ranging from family groups, choirs, and crowds to a whip-scarred back, wrinkled hands and a tear-streaked cheek. Included are civil-rights marchers, cotton pickers, portraits formal and candid, the famous, and the unknown. The photographs are so well chosen and so thoughtfully laid out that it’s a shame more recognition is not given to the book’s designer. Introduced with a personal and historical note by Henrietta M. Smith, capped by James Weldon Johnson’s brother’s simple musical arrangement, it’s a fitting tribute to a long struggle. Read it—better yet, sing it—to children, and let them pore over the powerful pictures. (musical notation, photo credits) (Picture book. 6+)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-7868-0626-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Disney-Jump at the Sun

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2000

LITTLE BUNNY FOO FOO

The Good Fairy doesn’t like tomfoolery. Little Bunny Foo Foo’s not a bad bunny, but he has mischief on his mind and a bunch of mud pies in his possession. He bops a group of field mice on the head and gets a warning from the Good Fairy. He has three chances and then she’ll turn him into a goon. He doesn’t listen and goes after woodchucks, foxes, and bears with his mud pies. Of course, the Good Fairy makes good on her threat. Johnson’s rendition of the classic children’s song is charming. His signature cartoonish illustrations are a perfect match, and turning the song into a narrative by the Good Fairy adds to the fun. The music and hand motions are included on the last page. Storytimers will be singing along from page one. (Picture book. 2-6)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2004

ISBN: 0-439-37301-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2003

CANADIAN RAILROAD TRILOGY

Sir John A. Macdonald once envisioned what Gordon Lightfoot called “an iron road runnin’ from the sea to the sea”—the Canadian Pacific Railway, begun in 1885. In this dramatic, oversized tribute to the construction of that mighty railroad, both the lyrics of Lightfoot’s song “Canadian Railroad Trilogy” (1967) and Wallace’s dazzling chalk pastels powerfully illustrate the manifestation of that ambitious dream, emphasizing the ethnically diverse people who made it possible and those whose lives were forever changed by it: “We are the navvies who work upon the railway, / Swingin’ our hammers in the bright blazin’ sun. / Layin’ down track and buildin’ the bridges, / Bendin’ our backs ’til the railroad is done.” The atmospheric illustrations—each explained in wonderfully detailed endnotes—capture not only the workers’ toil but also the splendor of the Canadian landscape and, obliquely, the price the displaced First Nations people paid for steam-train technology. (music and lyrics, illustrator’s notes, a brief history of the Canadian Pacific Railway, further reading) (Picture book. 4-8)

 

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-88899-953-5

Page Count: 56

Publisher: Groundwood

Review Posted Online: Sept. 15, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2010

SLEEPSONG

Lyon’s sonorous words meld with Catalanotto’s dreamy gouache-and-watercolor paintings in this tender lullaby. A mother and father’s faces glow with love as they prepare their little girl for her bedtime. Peek-a-boo, creative play, puzzle work, hide-and-seek and storytime take their places as family early-literacy activities alongside a boisterous bounce on the bed and a soothing bath. Together, mother and father enjoy their daughter thoroughly each step of the way, while the world and its creatures find a parallel peaceful goodnight. Each double-page spread depicts the humans’ activities in glowing, warm hues while blue-gray pigments color a soft-edged stripe at the bottom that shows the animals named in the text. This stripe begins the book just at the lower edge of the page and expands upward with each page turn until finally, in the last spread, it washes over the little girl, including her in its cozy nighttime swirl. Words and images together create a gentle rock-a-bye rhythm, topping off a collaborative effort that should grace all children’s collections. (lyrics and music) (Picture book. 0-3)

Pub Date: Jan. 6, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-689-86973-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Richard Jackson/Atheneum

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2008

INCH BY INCH

THE GARDEN SONG

The lyrics to the well-known children's song, a line or two per page, illustrated with charming scenes of a little boy and his dog making a garden. Large blocks of green, blue, and brown, with smaller sections of red and yellow, are juxtaposed like puzzle pieces to compose the illustrations. Clouds, shadows, flowers, and other elements migrate casually from the paintings and into the wide white borders. There are surprises: One spread showing a tall fantasy tree must be turned sideways; in another the boy tugs at an immense radish; a gigantic crow flaps in from the corner of a third. The song, in a simple piano arrangment, appears on the last two pages. Playful, forthright, and happy—with some seeds and a couple of small tools, this is a terrific gift for a young gardener. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: May 30, 1995

ISBN: 0-06-024303-1

Page Count: 36

Publisher: HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1995

HE'S GOT THE WHOLE WORLD IN HIS HANDS

Nelson uses the old spiritual—offered here, astonishingly, in its first singleton, illustrated edition, though it’s available in many collections—as a springboard to celebrate family togetherness. Each line of a four-verse version of the lyric captions an intimate scene of an African-American lad, three sibs (one, lighter-skinned, perhaps adopted) and two parents in various combinations, posing together in both city (San Francisco) and country settings, sharing “the moon and the stars,” “the wind and the clouds,” “the oceans and the seas,” and so on. Sandwiched between views of, more or less, the whole world, Nelson alternates finished paintings in his characteristic strong, bold style with authentically childlike crayon drawings done with his left hand—demonstrating a superb ability to evoke both grand and naïve effects. Moving, reverent, spiritual indeed. (musical arrangement to close) (Picture book. 5-7)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2005

ISBN: 978-0-8037-2850-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Dial

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2005

THE FARMER IN THE DELL

Caldecott Honor–artist Plume puts an Amish spin on the oft-sung favorite with lovely, old-fashioned, colored-pencil scenes and border designs inspired by Pennsylvania Dutch motifs and folk art. When “heigh-ho the derry-o,” the farmer in the dell makes his first appearance, he’s wearing overalls and scattering corn for the chickens and geese. Beautiful rolling hills and farm buildings with traditional decorative “hex signs” back the tranquil summer scene. The season shifts to autumn when “the farmer takes a wife,” and it is a snowy winter when “the wife takes a child.” The scenes bustle with happy family activity until the inevitable, poignant moment when “the cheese stands alone.” The back matter of this creamy-papered, unusually horizontal book includes detailed instructions on how to play the song-based circle game; complete lyrics; information on the Pennsylvania Dutch–inspired artwork and clothing and the German-born illustrator’s own Pennsylvania connection; and the musical notation for the first verse of the song. An elegant tribute to an American classic. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 30, 2004

ISBN: 1-56792-270-8

Page Count: 28

Publisher: Godine

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2004

THE CARNIVAL OF THE ANIMALS

A distinguished trio combine for a fresh, accessible and wonderfully appealing reimagining of a classic 19th-century “program music” favorite (“program music” being music specifically created to describe or depict a visual image): Camille Saint-Saëns’s evocative 1886 favorite. Long a standby of the “light” classical-music repertoire, Carnival continues to be many a child’s first introduction to live orchestral performance. Prelutsky, the 2006 American Children’s Poet Laureate, has created a suite of lively, appealing poems that combine perfectly with inventive musical impressions of such animals as a lion, elephants, a tortoise and a swan. GrandPré employs a vibrant hibiscus flower–toned palette in her whimsical interpretations of the animals featured. The CD prepared especially to accompany the book is a knockout. Both music and poetry come alive in the poet’s telling and a world-class performance by the prestigious Württemberg Chamber Orchestra Heilbronn. Their interpretation is fresh, engaging and exciting. A helpful note on the composer and his piece rounds out a fine package— it’s an irresistible poetic and musical experience for youngsters. (Picture book/poetry. 6-12)

Pub Date: Aug. 24, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-375-86458-2

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: July 21, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2010

TURN! TURN! TURN!

The title of Pete Seeger’s best-known song is also the best way to view Halperin’s art; for each line of lyrics, she offers a circular painting, composed in the round and containing dozens of microscopically precise vignettes exemplifying the given idea. The whirl of human, animal, and imaginary figures makes mesmerizing viewing: “A time to die,” for instance, is bordered by multiple scenes of predators, prey, and predation in sequence; what three pigs “build up,” a huffing, puffing wolf breaks down; and dozens of children, each a distinct individual, hold hands in a great arch over the final promise. Seeger himself makes occasional appearances in the pictures, and adds a closing account of how—and why—the song came to be written. Halperin is in top form here, creating a worthy, engrossing exegesis for the timeless wisdom of Ecclesiastes. Packaged with musical arrangement, and a CD with versions of the song by Seeger and the Byrds. (Picture book. 7-9)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2003

ISBN: 0-689-85235-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2003

“All God’s critters got a place in the choir,” indeed.

ALL GOD’S CRITTERS

The catchy, feel-good folk song comes to life like never before in this spirited production.

Framing the initial spread with rich, red curtains, Nelson creates a stage production into which he ultimately draws all of the animals that appear in the lyrics, including, among others, several types of birds, an enormous, shiny hippo and a pony sporting daisies and braids in her mane. The singing and dancing animals are a delightful combination of hyper-realism and ridiculousness that often spills right off the pages. One of the final spreads is a fold-out in which the outer leaves serve as stage curtains that open to reveal a four-panel spread featuring the entire cast of characters in an exuberant chorus line. It is the next spread that truly captures the spirit of the song, however, as the visual perspective dramatically swings around, allowing readers to look from the stage out into the audience of assorted animals who, it turns out, are putting on a show of their own.

“All God’s critters got a place in the choir,” indeed. (Picture Book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Jan. 27, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-689-86959-4

Page Count: 36

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2008

JESUS LOVES ME!

The words to this traditional children’s hymn serve as the text for a pleasant interpretation focusing on a family of three bears: a father, mother and child. The storyline begins with the father bear reading a children’s Bible with the little bear and continues throughout the family’s day as they garden, fish, bake and decorate Easter eggs. On several spreads the bears are shown hiking and singing the words of the song together, indicated by speech balloons. The general theme of love and caring for others is always apparent even on those pages where the words of the song aren’t directly related to the bears’ activities. Warnes provides engaging illustrations of the smiling bear family, with expressive faces and charming details such as a fiddle and a fishing hat for the father and a stuffed bunny for the child instead of a teddy bear. This reassuring version of a beloved Sunday-School standard provides an introductory context to the song for very young children, who will enjoy the cozy world of this anthropomorphic bear family. Music and guitar chords are included. (Picture book. 1-5)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2006

ISBN: 1-4169-0065-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2006

PUFF THE MAGIC DRAGON

A lovely—and indeed magical—shift and the beloved anthem becomes quite a satisfying read-aloud for children (and adults). Co-author Lipton says he had no idea that there was a Hanalei Bay with a lava cave just the right size for a dragon, but that’s where Puff lives in Honalee. And though Jackie Paper grows up too much to stay with Puff, in the final images he brings his daughter to frolic with the dragon. Puybaret’s acrylic-on-linen paintings have smooth edges, elongated shapes and rich matte colors as well as Bosch-ian touches: On Honalee there are peopleflies instead of dragonflies; the dolphins sport mortarboards and gondolier T-shirts; the deeply non-ferocious pirate captain has a hook and an eye patch all the same. A CD with four songs, two of them versions of “Puff,” makes a very nice package indeed, especially since Yarrow sings with his daughter. (Picture book and CD. 4-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 2007

ISBN: 978-1-4027-4782-3

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Sterling

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2007

THE PETER YARROW SONGBOOK, #3

LET’S SING TOGETHER!

This musical celebration meant for a family car trip, an evening at home or a campfire sing-along include some of Yarrow’s (of Peter, Paul, & Mary fame) family favorites. Organized in three sections—illustrated lyrics, lyrics with chords and song histories—the collection begins with the spiritual “This Little Light of Mine” and ends with “Oh, You Can’t Get to Heaven.” In between are ten well-known historic, silly or protest songs, with Widener’s acrylic illustrations evoking a down-home optimism that suggests persistence and solidarity. The accompanying CD features a pleasant combination of voice types: The singer’s rich tone anchors each song, and his daughter’s light, lyric voice dances around his crystal-clear enunciation, all backed up by children’s enthusiastic voices. Notable is “John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt” for joy and humor. The illustrated format will draw in younger children, ideally prompting them to ask for a group sing, and the author’s notes and messages will both encourage young musicians’ creativity and add insight into the songs’ history. This volume is the third in the Peter Yarrow Songbook series. (Nonfiction. 7-11)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2009

ISBN: 978-1-4027-5963-5

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Sterling

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2009

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