Books by Alma Flor Ada

YES! WE ARE LATINOS! by Alma Flor Ada
Released: Aug. 1, 2013

A poetic celebration of the diversity found among Latinos. Read full book review >
Released: July 10, 2012

"A charming story, especially for children facing the loss of grandparents. (recipes) (Fiction. 8-12)"
Ada and Zubizarreta (Dancing Home, 2011) reunite to focus on a young Latina girl coping with loss. Read full book review >
DANCING HOME by Alma Flor Ada
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: July 12, 2011

"Although sometimes wise beyond their years, Margie and Lupe will charm readers as each girl struggles for belonging and acceptance in this realistic novel. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Two cousins, one born in Texas and the other in Mexico, learn the importance of family and friendship. Read full book review >
LET ME HELP!/¡QUIERO AYUDAR! by Alma Flor Ada
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2010

Like a young child eager to help, Perico, the parrot, is excited about the upcoming Cinco de Mayo preparations and repeatedly cries, "Let me help! / ¡Quiero ayudar!"—a phrase learned from his family's youngest child, Martita. Read full book review >

NONFICTION
Released: March 1, 2010

Ada and Campoy team up again (¡Pío Peep!, 2003, etc.) to produce this lovely anthology of rhymes, songs and poems from the Hispanic oral tradition. Read full book review >

EXTRA! EXTRA! by Alma Flor Ada
FANTASY
Released: July 10, 2007

Ada's latest is a continuation of the Hidden Forest series of fairy-tale adventures, but this time, several editions of the Hidden Forest News newspaper replace the letters of the previous books. Read full book review >

FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

These lovingly collected and beautifully presented tales take in a wide swath of history and cultures, from Spain, long a crossroads between Europe and Africa, to North America and Latin America, with their own rich heritages. Read full book review >

MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: March 1, 2005

Gathering fresh material, Ada and colleagues expand the scope of ¡Pio Peep! Read full book review >

¡PÍO PEEP! by Alma Flor Ada
POETRY
Released: April 1, 2003

Hoping to introduce the rich heritage of Spanish nursery rhymes to children of all backgrounds, the editors have selected many of the best-known traditional rhymes, most originally from Spain, but now spread throughout Latin America. Read full book review >

I LOVE SATURDAYS Y DOMINGOS by Alma Flor Ada
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Jan. 1, 2002

With English- and Spanish-speaking grandparents, the child in this story explores the wonders of both cultures. Read full book review >

WITH LOVE, LITTLE RED HEN by Alma Flor Ada
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

Lovers of fractured fairy tales will be amused by this further peek into the personal letters of familiar characters by the team that started it all with Dear Peter Rabbit (1994). Ms. Red Hen has just moved to Happy Valley with her brood of chicks, but her neighbors are proving to be less than neighborly. Read full book review >

DANIEL’S MYSTERY EGG by Alma Flor Ada
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

Daniel finds a small egg underneath a bush. Read full book review >

THE THREE GOLDEN ORANGES by Alma Flor Ada
Released: May 1, 1999

Ada (Under the Royal Palms, 1998, etc.) reworks the traditional story of Blancaflor, taking swipes at greed, vanity, and the practice of arranged marriages in the process. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

Of books comprising nuggets of memory there seems to be no end, and in a companion volume to her Where the Flame Trees Bloom (1994, not reviewed), Ada recounts small stories of growing up in the town of in CamagÅey, Cuba. Read full book review >

THE MALACHITE PALACE by Alma Flor Ada
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1998

From Ada (The Lizard and the Sun, 1997, etc.), an original fairy tale that is predictable, elevated to beauty by Gore's paintings. Read full book review >

FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Dec. 1, 1997

A lilting Spanish text and its weak English counterpart relate a cumulative tale about the decorating of a tree, and provide a good argument against the use of bilingual texts. ``Look at the beautiful Christmas tree/with the bright candle/Grandma lit,/the candy cane/Grandpa hung,/and the sleigh/Uncle Irineo painted!'' cannot compare to ``¤QuÇ lindo el †rbol de Navidad/adornado con la vela/que encendi¢ Abuela,/con el caramelo/que le colg¢ Abuelo/y con el trineo/de t°o Irineo!'' These events are illustrated over several pages. Read full book review >

THE LIZARD AND THE SUN/LA LAGARTIJA Y EL SOL by Alma Flor Ada
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

Ada (Mediopollito/Half-Chicken, 1995, etc.) elongates a Mexican folktale about a tenacious lizard who won't stop looking for the sun when it disappears; D†valos creates a series of half-lit, blue-toned spreads that evoke the world of the Aztec empire. A first-person introduction explains natural absences of the sun (behind the clouds, etc.), and prepares readers for a time, long ago, when the sun disappeared for no reason. Read full book review >

MEDIOPOLLITO/HALF-CHICKEN by Alma Flor Ada
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

A traditional Spanish tale of how the weathervane came to be, set in Mexico and told in Spanish on the left page of each spread, and English on the right. Read full book review >

DEAR PETER RABBIT by Alma Flor Ada
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

The events in four familiar tales are cleverly intertwined and reported in a dozen letters. ``Pig One'' invites Peter Rabbit to a housewarming, but he can't go because he's in bed sipping camomile; Baby Bear wants his new friend Goldilocks McGregor to visit; Pigs One and Two report that they're now safely with Pig Three; Peter gets an unexpected invitation from Goldilocks and compliments the three pigs on the wolf's-tail soup served at the housewarming they finally managed to celebrate; the wolf orders a new tail and swears off pigs and little girls. Read full book review >

MY NAME IS MARIA ISABEL by Alma Flor Ada
FICTION
Released: April 30, 1993

When Mar°a Isabel Salazar L¢pez's family moves, there are already two Mar°as in her new class, so the teacher decides to call her Mary L¢pez. Read full book review >

ANIMALS
Released: April 21, 1993

A cumulative tale that echoes ``The Old Woman and Her Pig.'' Since the debonair rooster is so busy preening his feathers and polishing his beak that he skips breakfast, the kernel of corn he finds on his way to the wedding is tempting, though it's in a puddle. Read full book review >