Monster mehs.

READ REVIEW

LITTLE MONSTER TRUCKS GO!

What starts as a standard auto race evolves (quite literally) into a cooperative lesson.

Primed and pumped to conquer, five “scrappy little monster trucks” (resembling a cat, wedge of Swiss cheese, knight, shark, and unicorn) race one another along a twisty, turny obstacle course. Fortunately, every problem they encounter has a solution, as the trucks use their special features to escape muck and leap over gaps. But what’s this? A humongous boulder stumps the intrepid racers such that none can beat it separately. Then, in a singularly Voltron-esque move, the trucks shift their parts and combine to form a single “Monster Bot” capable of stomping the stony impediment to bits. The result? A five-way tie, naturally. Unexciting art gets the job done, not impressing with style so much as with mild ingenuity. As these are little trucks, it seems fitting that it’s the book’s little touches (such as the cheese truck’s grater mode or the cat truck’s extendable claws) that are the most droll. Alas, what it lacks in looks it does not quite make up for in writing. Perfunctory rhymes occasionally give way to soft ones (“A MONSTER leap with mid-air flips / The gap’s TOO BIG! They’ll DROP LIKE BRICKS!”). Adult readers may twitch, but the young and vehicularly obsessed probably won’t mind.

Monster mehs. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: April 7, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-936669-83-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: blue manatee press

Review Posted Online: Jan. 12, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2020

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A sweet, tender and charming experience to read aloud or together.

HEY, DUCK!

A clueless duckling tries to make a new friend.

He is confused by this peculiar-looking duck, who has a long tail, doesn’t waddle and likes to be alone. No matter how explicitly the creature denies he is a duck and announces that he is a cat, the duckling refuses to acknowledge the facts.  When this creature expresses complete lack of interest in playing puddle stomp, the little ducking goes off and plays on his own. But the cat is not without remorse for rejecting an offered friendship. Of course it all ends happily, with the two new friends enjoying each other’s company. Bramsen employs brief sentences and the simplest of rhymes to tell this slight tale. The two heroes are meticulously drawn with endearing, expressive faces and body language, and their feathers and fur appear textured and touchable. Even the detailed tree bark and grass seem three-dimensional. There are single- and double-page spreads, panels surrounded by white space and circular and oval frames, all in a variety of eye-pleasing juxtapositions. While the initial appeal is solidly visual, young readers will get the gentle message that friendship is not something to take for granted but is to be embraced with open arms—or paws and webbed feet.

A sweet, tender and charming experience to read aloud or together. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Jan. 22, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-375-86990-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Nov. 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2012

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Who ya gonna call? A different snowplow book.

SCOOPER AND DUMPER

Friends don’t let friends expire in snowdrifts.

Convoluted storytelling and confusing art turn a cute premise into a mishmash of a book. Scooper’s a front loader that works in the town salt yard, replenishing the snowplows that arrive. Dumper’s her best friend, more than happy to plow and salt the roads himself. When the big city calls in Dumper to help with a snow squall, he brushes off Scooper’s concerns. Yet slippery roads and a seven-vehicle pileup launch poor Dumper onto his side in a snowbank. Can Scooper overcome fears that she’s too slow and save the day? Following a plot as succinct as this should be a breeze, but the rhyming text obfuscates more than it clarifies. Lines such as, “Dumper’s here— / let’s rock ’n’ roll! / Big city’s callin’ for / some small-town soul” can prove impenetrable. The art of the book matches this confusion, with light-blue Dumper often hard to pick out among other, similarly colored vehicles, particularly in the snowstorm. Speech bubbles, as when the city calls for Scooper’s and Dumper’s help, lead to a great deal of visual confusion. Scooper is also featured sporting long eyelashes and a bow, lest anyone mistake the dithering, frightened truck as anything but female. (This book was reviewed digitally with 11-by-17-inch double-page spreads viewed at 16.8% of actual size.)

Who ya gonna call? A different snowplow book. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Nov. 17, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-5420-9268-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Two Lions

Review Posted Online: Sept. 15, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2020

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