THE LAST SPY by John Griffiths

THE LAST SPY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

 Soviet neo-Stalinists and a couple of highly placed Americans have one last go at preserving the cold war before democracy ruins everything--in another smart thriller by the author of The Good Spy (1990), etc. Henry Kissinger won't like this one. The ex-academic, former secretary of state, heavy-handed skirt-chaser with the oversized noggin and impenetrable accent is one of the bad guys seizing the final minutes of the Gorbachev reign as the last opportunity to put the deep chill back into international relations before the cold warriors and think-tankers lose their meal tickets forever. The masterminds in this plot to undo the peace wrought by the man they call ``Blotface'' are Politburo members and KGB types who plan to activate Adam Kalugin, a long-buried operative in London, and use him to stir up trouble in the Ukraine. Kalugin is supposed to rouse the little band of Ukrainian expatriates to action and, with technical and financial assistance believed to be from the CIA, return to the homeland to foment unrest, creating an excuse for Moscow to crack down, derailing the peace movement for the rest of the century. But Kalugin, who was tops in his KGB cadet class, is not a complete company man. His paramount goal is not to serve the state but to revenge himself on the KGB officer who drove his sister to suicide. A further destabilizing factor: As a healthy young male, Kalugin is susceptible to the attractions of a lovely, ideologically unattached American in the employ of the mischievous think tank. And then there's the problem of Mr. Pickett, an honest American intelligence officer who shares Kalugin's taste in political scientists and who has picked up the false notes in Kalugin's legend. He threatens to undo all the bad work. Griffiths may have overdrawn the villains, but his young lovers and hopelessly brash Ukrainians are immensely attractive.

Pub Date: Sept. 15th, 1992
ISBN: 0-88184-797-6
Page count: 304pp
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15th, 1992