PAL JOEY by John O'Hara

PAL JOEY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

O'Hara has had two redeeming characteristics, even in his least successful books, -- a keen ear for the language and speech of his fellows, no matter in what social class, and a vigorous sense of plot. Now, in Pal Joey (some of which has appeared in The New Yorker), the plot limps badly, as a series of letters from one night club entertainer, in "the sticks" writes to another and more successful friend back home (in New York). It seems to me a bit of cheap fustian; tough without the underlying human quality that redeems toughness; common -- or should we say vulgar -- in the recurrent boasts of his male prowess and his low estimate of the female sex, members of which he characterizes as "mice". He has no conscience about taking them for a ride; he confesses to the reverse side of the picture now and again.
Pub Date: Oct. 23rd, 1940
Publisher: Duell, Sloan & Pearce
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1st, 1940




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