A BIRD IN THE HOUSE by Lynn Arbor

A BIRD IN THE HOUSE

Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

After a traumatic car accident leaves her addled, a woman struggles to care for her aging mother in this novel.

Dee Ellison Chope, 64, lives with her 90-year-old mother, Bessie, whose mental faculties have deteriorated enough that she requires nearly constant supervision. Sixteen years earlier, Dee was in a horrible car accident that killed her husband, and a serious brain injury left her similarly in need of care. She moved back into her parents’ house, but just as she recovered enough to live on her own, her father died suddenly, leaving Bessie alone and saddled with debt. Dee had to find work to pay off a second mortgage on the home and stayed to assist her aging and increasingly helpless mother. Meanwhile, her younger brother, Georgie, always favored by Bessie and forever selfish, schemes to purloin the house for his own financial self-aggrandizement, even in advance of Bessie’s death. But Dee discovers that Georgie had borrowed a considerable sum of money from her father before he died, a loan she essentially repaid by covering the second mortgage. Georgie calls Adult Protective Services to have his mother committed to a home, forcing Dee to defend the quality of her custodianship. Separated from her grown-up children, widowed, and tasked with caring for a mother she had a difficult relationship with, Dee finds her life stalled until she gives romance another try. Arbor’s (Intentional, 2015) lucid prose poignantly captures Dee’s ambivalence about a family she loves but that often disappoints her: “Her brother murdered her favorite doll. He never touched or hurt any of her other dolls, so he wasn’t a serial killer. He just chose the prettiest, the one with her dress perfectly arranged on a messy shelf, the one she loved the most—the one her father gave her.” The depiction of Georgie flirts with hyperbole—he’s given almost no redeemable features. But Dee is bottomless in her complexity, a woman coping with her mother, mortality, and a bird in the house (“Dee still had most of her marbles, and however much she wanted to, she couldn’t blank out the image of the dead bird she’d discovered in the fireplace that morning. A bird in the house is bad luck. Someone’s gonna die”). She’s a protagonist worthy of the reader’s gripping interest.

A beautifully written story about loss and second chances.

Pub Date: Oct. 2nd, 2017
ISBN: 978-0-9862206-3-0
Page count: 286pp
Publisher: Spring Forward Publishing
Program: Kirkus Indie
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15th, 2017




SIMILAR BOOKS SUGGESTED BY OUR CRITICS:

FictionMY MISTRESS’S SPARROW IS DEAD by Jeffrey Eugenides
by Jeffrey Eugenides
FictionLILA by Marilynne Robinson
by Marilynne Robinson
FictionEVERYBODY KNOWS THIS IS NOWHERE by John McFetridge
by John McFetridge