SQUIRE HAGGARD’S JOURNAL by Michael Green

SQUIRE HAGGARD’S JOURNAL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Prion reprints this humor classic in honor of its 25th anniversary, though its origins are in a regular column published in The Daily Telegraph during the 1960s, and it's familiar to a British audience from a BBC adaptation. Green’s parody of an 18th-century diary plays with conventions recognizable from Pepys or Boswell: the chronicle of daily expenses, strange things eaten, and whores indulged. The cheap, brutal, drunk and corpulent Squire also records the local deaths, from "Griping of the Guts" and "the Windy Spasms" to the "Spasmodick Rumblings." Detested by his tenants and his hectoring wife, Amos Haggard relies on the good marriage of his son—a dim and horny Oxford student—to solve his financial troubles. Instead, the two find themselves on a transcontinental debauch, paying their way by cheating at cards and winning contests at belching and expectorating. Baron von Munchausen, Lafayette, and Samuel Johnson make cameo appearances—the last stealing from Haggard a few of his best lines. Read as a weekly column, this might not seem quite as repetitious as it inevitably becomes here.

Pub Date: Feb. 15th, 2001
ISBN: 1-85375-399-8
Page count: 176pp
Publisher: Prion/Trafalgar
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1st, 2001