THE HUNT FOR ZERO POINT by Nick Cook

THE HUNT FOR ZERO POINT

Inside the Classified World of Antigravity Technology
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KIRKUS REVIEW

When Nazis, flying saucers, and government conspiracies figure in a single narrative, you’ve got the makings of either a crackpot manifesto or an intriguing work of scientific speculation. Thankfully, the aviation editor for Jane’s Defence Weekly delivers the latter.

Cook’s spirited if sometimes improbable tale turns on the question of whether human beings might be able to harness and thereby defy gravity in order to do such things as travel through time and cross the galaxy at the speed of light. It’s theoretically possible, Cook suggests; for at least a couple of generations, some physicists have suspected that the universe conceals a fifth dimension—hyperspace—in which gravity as we understand it no longer applies. Getting to that point, of course, presents plenty of practical problems, but that has not discouraged the efforts of engineers, from the Nazi scientists who gave the world jet fighters and the V2 rocket to some of NASA’s best and brightest. Though much of his argument involves questionable evidence and a cool-to-cold trail, Cook examines Nazi efforts to develop “flying discs” (the disc, it appears, is the ideal shape for an antigravity aircraft) and considers the possibility that after WWII, American engineers might have whisked a few Nazi documents (or, for that matter, scientists) off to their labs to continue the experiments. If so, he speculates, then the UFOs that began to pop up in Air Force and police reports in great numbers beginning in the late 1940s might in fact have been antigravitational aircraft making test flights. Cook, who clearly knows his technology, is fully aware that he sometimes treads in the territory of what scientists call “The Legend”; he cautions that no single explanation can satisfactorily account for all the UFO sightings on record.

Hardheaded rationalists will likely take this with a shakerful of salt, but technology enthusiasts, aviation buffs, and UFO watchers should find it fascinating.

Pub Date: Aug. 13th, 2002
ISBN: 0-7679-0627-6
Page count: 304pp
Publisher: Broadway
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1st, 2002




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