Silliness resolves into true affection in this airy encore.

READ REVIEW

OPPOSITE DAY

From the Dill & Bizzy series

Dill, an “odd duck,” and Bizzy, a “strange bird,” return following their eponymous debut to find their friendship tested as they spend a day doing everything the opposite way.

Bizzy, awake early for a change, decides that it is Opposite Day and, to Dill’s dismay and annoyance, declares that they will do their usual daily routine in the reverse. So instead of beginning the day with breakfast, they will start with dinner. Rather than a slow morning waddle, they will go on a fast morning run. Flying up to the sky will be replaced with flying down to the ground. Poor Dill just wants a quiet day, but Bizzy’s convinced he really would enjoy a loud dance party. Dill’s protestations escalate (“NO! NO! STOP!”) while Bizzy continues to turn around every statement and activity (“YES! YES! GO!”). By day’s end both feathered friends realize the absurdity when Bizzy admits that “the opposite of going to sleep is staying up all night! Opposite Day will go on forever!” Opposite Day then would also mean they must be worst enemies instead of best friends. Unimaginable! The two resolve to always be best friends every day. This author/illustrator team of sisters harmoniously combines a dialogue-driven narrative with animated black-outlined, digitally colored cartoon drawings.

Silliness resolves into true affection in this airy encore. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Jan. 24, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-06-230453-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Sept. 19, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2016

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Should be packaged with an oxygen supply, as it will incontestably elicit uncontrollable gales of giggles.

THE DINKY DONKEY

Even more alliterative hanky-panky from the creators of The Wonky Donkey (2010).

Operating on the principle (valid, here) that anything worth doing is worth overdoing, Smith and Cowley give their wildly popular Wonky Donkey a daughter—who, being “cute and small,” was a “dinky donkey”; having “beautiful long eyelashes” she was in consequence a “blinky dinky donkey”; and so on…and on…and on until the cumulative chorus sails past silly and ludicrous to irresistibly hysterical: “She was a stinky funky plinky-plonky winky-tinky,” etc. The repeating “Hee Haw!” chorus hardly suggests what any audience’s escalating response will be. In the illustrations the daughter sports her parent’s big, shiny eyes and winsome grin while posing in a multicolored mohawk next to a rustic boombox (“She was a punky blinky”), painting her hooves pink, crossing her rear legs to signal a need to pee (“winky-tinky inky-pinky”), demonstrating her smelliness with the help of a histrionic hummingbird, and finally cozying up to her proud, evidently single parent (there’s no sign of another) for a closing cuddle.

Should be packaged with an oxygen supply, as it will incontestably elicit uncontrollable gales of giggles. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Nov. 5, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-338-60083-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Oct. 13, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2019

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But it is the parting sentence that will hit home with everyone: “But Rufus loved storytime most of all… / …because it gave...

RUFUS GOES TO SCHOOL

Rufus Leroy Williams III is determined to learn how to read, but can he convince Principal Lipid to allow a pig in school?

Rufus makes the best of his illiteracy by imagining his own stories to go with the pictures in his favorite book, but still he longs to read. The tiny pig knows just how to solve his problem, though: With a backpack, he can go to school. But Principal Lipid seems to think it takes more than a backpack to attend school—if you are a pig, that is, since pigs are sure to wreak all sorts of havoc in school: track mud, start food fights, etc. Rufus decides a lunchbox is just the ticket, but the principal feels differently. Maybe a blanket for naptime? Or promises not to engage in specific behaviors? Nope. But the real necessary items were with Rufus all along—a book and the desire to learn to read it. Gorbachev’s ink-and-watercolor illustrations emphasize Rufus’ small size, making both his desire and the principal’s rejection seem that much larger. Parents and teachers beware: The humorous pages of imagined, naughty behavior may be more likely to catch children’ eyes than Rufus’ earnestly good behavior.

But it is the parting sentence that will hit home with everyone: “But Rufus loved storytime most of all… / …because it gave him room to dream.” (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Aug. 6, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-4549-0416-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Sterling

Review Posted Online: June 26, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2013

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