DIFFERENT PEOPLE

Back to the drawing board.

Ineptly written tale about two gay men whose lives intersect over the years.

Coming-of-age in Reno, Eric Hamilton and Cal Hewitt sense a powerful attraction to each other. In a park one day, Eric summons the courage to kiss Cal passionately and Cal recoils. The move was foolhardy, Cal protests, since it nearly sparked a beating from onlooking gay-bashers. Other forces prevent Cal from opening up to a relationship with Eric—in particular, Cal’s Christian fundamentalist parents and their homophobia. The men take separate paths. Eric embraces gay life in San Francisco in the ’80s as he fights through ACT UP for the rights of AIDS victims. Eventually frustrated by that group’s infighting, he travels to New York, where he quickly finds professional and personal success. He wins writing assignments from major magazines and the love and partnership of another man. Meanwhile, Cal takes a destructive course. Still closeted, he is able to have sex only when he’s on drugs (“He had resigned himself to his Sisyphean doom”). Soon he’s hustling the streets of San Francisco for drug money, eventually suffering a mental breakdown. Returned to Reno to recover, Cal learns that Eric has also come back home for healing after the death of his mother (from cancer) and of his boyfriend (from AIDS). Predictably, the two begin to forge a relationship. The point that many forces buffet gay love (or any love, for that matter) and that the love still survives is a strong one, however familiar. But rather than dramatize the theme, Outland (the nonfiction Coming Out, 2000, etc.) stalls his story with a seemingly interminable series of banal and ponderous authorial observations (“Power is addictive in the simplest sense, in that once addicted, you can never get enough”), clichés (“his writing . . . took wing”), stilted dialogue, and cumbersome sentences.

Back to the drawing board.

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2002

ISBN: 1-55583-763-8

Page Count: 256

Publisher: Alyson

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2002

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A LITTLE LIFE

The phrase “tour de force” could have been invented for this audacious novel.

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Four men who meet as college roommates move to New York and spend the next three decades gaining renown in their professions—as an architect, painter, actor and lawyer—and struggling with demons in their intertwined personal lives.

Yanagihara (The People in the Trees, 2013) takes the still-bold leap of writing about characters who don’t share her background; in addition to being male, JB is African-American, Malcolm has a black father and white mother, Willem is white, and “Jude’s race was undetermined”—deserted at birth, he was raised in a monastery and had an unspeakably traumatic childhood that’s revealed slowly over the course of the book. Two of them are gay, one straight and one bisexual. There isn’t a single significant female character, and for a long novel, there isn’t much plot. There aren’t even many markers of what’s happening in the outside world; Jude moves to a loft in SoHo as a young man, but we don’t see the neighborhood change from gritty artists’ enclave to glitzy tourist destination. What we get instead is an intensely interior look at the friends’ psyches and relationships, and it’s utterly enthralling. The four men think about work and creativity and success and failure; they cook for each other, compete with each other and jostle for each other’s affection. JB bases his entire artistic career on painting portraits of his friends, while Malcolm takes care of them by designing their apartments and houses. When Jude, as an adult, is adopted by his favorite Harvard law professor, his friends join him for Thanksgiving in Cambridge every year. And when Willem becomes a movie star, they all bask in his glow. Eventually, the tone darkens and the story narrows to focus on Jude as the pain of his past cuts deep into his carefully constructed life.  

The phrase “tour de force” could have been invented for this audacious novel.

Pub Date: March 10, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-385-53925-8

Page Count: 720

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: Dec. 21, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2015

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MAGIC HOUR

Wacky plot keeps the pages turning and enduring schmaltzy romantic sequences.

Sisters work together to solve a child-abandonment case.

Ellie and Julia Cates have never been close. Julia is shy and brainy; Ellie gets by on charm and looks. Their differences must be tossed aside when a traumatized young girl wanders in from the forest into their hometown in Washington. The sisters’ professional skills are put to the test. Julia is a world-renowned child psychologist who has lost her edge. She is reeling from a case that went publicly sour. Though she was cleared of all wrongdoing, Julia’s name was tarnished, forcing her to shutter her Beverly Hills practice. Ellie Barton is the local police chief in Rain Valley, who’s never faced a tougher case. This is her chance to prove she is more than just a fading homecoming queen, but a scarcity of clues and a reluctant victim make locating the girl’s parents nearly impossible. Ellie places an SOS call to her sister; she needs an expert to rehabilitate this wild-child who has been living outside of civilization for years. Confronted with her professional demons, Julia once again has the opportunity to display her talents and salvage her reputation. Hannah (The Things We Do for Love, 2004, etc.) is at her best when writing from the girl’s perspective. The feral wolf-child keeps the reader interested long after the other, transparent characters have grown tiresome. Hannah’s torturously over-written romance passages are stale, but there are surprises in store as the sisters set about unearthing Alice’s past and creating a home for her.

Wacky plot keeps the pages turning and enduring schmaltzy romantic sequences.

Pub Date: March 1, 2006

ISBN: 0-345-46752-3

Page Count: 400

Publisher: Ballantine

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2005

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