Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"A worthy broadside aimed at revisionist Christian historians that provides a sorely needed counterpoint to the prevailing and largely unquestioned conventional wisdom regarding early Christian history."
Jenkins (History, Institute for the Studies of Religion/Baylor Univ.; The Great and Holy War: How World War I Became a Religious Crusade, 2014, etc.) attacks the current mainstream view of church history, which posits the disappearance of competing Christian literature due to early repression by the established orthodoxy. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"Well-reasoned advice sure to fall on many deaf ears."
A retired politician advises people of faith on how to influence politics in a civilized manner. Read full book review >

BETWEEN GODS by Alison Pick
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"A poignant and powerful memoir of family, religion, love, and healing."
An award-winning Canadian writer's account of how learning a family secret led her to embark on a journey of spiritual transformation and religious conversion. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"An enchanting and addictive report shedding much-needed light on a spiritualistic community obfuscated by historical misinterpretation and pop-culture derision."
A self-avowed skeptic investigates the shadowy world of modern witchcraft. Read full book review >
THE GIVENNESS OF THINGS by Marilynne Robinson
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"Deeply thoughtful essays on troubling and divisive cultural—and spiritual—issues."
A sober, passionate defense of Christian faith. Read full book review >

Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"Another deeply felt entry on two divergent, yet ultimately compatible, ways of engaging the world and understanding reality."
The New Atheists have it all wrong, insists McGrath (Science and Religion/Oxford Univ.; C.S. Lewis—A Life: Eccentric Genius, Reluctant Prophet, 2013, etc.).Read full book review >
AUGUSTINE by Robin Lane Fox
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"An erudite and ordered reading of Augustine's Confessions and a worthy addition to any library on early Christianity."
A comprehensive literary biography of the great Christian thinker Augustine (354-430). Read full book review >
THE GOOD BOOK by Andrew Blauner
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A smug, disappointing collection."
A collection of essays—ranging from brief polemic to biography to short fiction—on the Bible. Read full book review >
THE 613 by Archie Rand
Kirkus Star
by Archie Rand, illustrated by Archie Rand
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"As a book, it stands on its own rather than merely evoking a larger wall display, reaching a much wider audience in the process."
A monumental art project is transformed into wildly ambitious graphic literature. Read full book review >
THE LIGHT BETWEEN US by Laura Lynne Jackson
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"These candid, fascinating experiences impart significance and possibility to the science of psychic conveyance."
A psychic medium discusses her ability to communicate with the dead. Read full book review >
BATTLING THE GODS by Tim Whitmarsh
Released: Nov. 13, 2015

"Though not for those seeking a light read, this is a seminal work on the subject, to be studied, reread, and referenced."
Whitmarsh (Greek Culture/Univ. of Cambridge; Beyond the Second Sophistic: Adventures in Greek Postclassicism, 2013, etc.) explores the evolution of atheism from Homer to the Roman Empire.Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 20, 2015

"Refreshingly nonpolemical—will be of special interest to secular parents struggling with some of the issues presented."
To Sunday school or not to Sunday school? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >