Books by Leonid Gore

WORMS FOR LUNCH? by Leonid Gore
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2011

"Sure to be a popular choice for storytimes, with its short sentences and simple vocabulary, this is also a solid choice for beginning readers. (Picture book. 3-7)"
"Who eats worms for lunch?" Read full book review >
THE WONDERFUL BOOK by Leonid Gore
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"Children just beginning to recognize books as objects will appreciate the animals' confusion and their own advanced understanding. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Woodland critters utilize a found object while Gore plays gently with metatextuality. Read full book review >
WHEN I GROW UP by Leonid Gore
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2009

"The boy contemplates his option and then declares to his dad that he will be 'just like you!' (Picture book. 3-5)"
A little boy wonders aloud what he might be when he grows up and receives a number of suggestions from a variety of sources. Read full book review >
MOMMY, WHERE ARE YOU? by Leonid Gore
ANIMALS
Released: March 24, 2009

"Although it doesn't have the visual or verbal weight of Owl Babies, it has its own small charm. (Picture book. 2-4)"
When young Ozzy wakes up one morning to find his mother missing, the young mouse panics and rushes to find her. Read full book review >
MONARCH AND MILKWEED by Helen Frost
ANIMALS
Released: March 4, 2008

"It's no easy feat to make something stationary that's as dynamic as a butterfly—these illustrations manage it handily. (author's note) (Picture book/nonfiction. 3-7)"
There are books aplenty on monarch butterflies, on their remarkable life cycle and even more remarkable transcontinental migration. Read full book review >
DANNY’S FIRST SNOW by Leonid Gore
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 23, 2007

"The simple, well-written text, original plot and perceptive illustrations make Danny's story a treat for wintry story times. (Picture book. 2-5)"
An appealing little rabbit named Danny experiences his first snowfall in this delightfully original view of a youngster's introduction to a snow-covered world. Read full book review >
THE SECRET OF THE PAINTED HOUSE by Marion Dane Bauer
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 10, 2007

"There is also a valuable message woven into the tale, as Emily learns through this scare just how very important are the ordinary, even annoying things in her life, such as her little brother. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Like The Blue Ghost (2005), Bauer's latest is a well-written beginning chapter book with plenty of suspense and mystery to keep young readers turning pages. Read full book review >
SPARKS FLY HIGH by Mary Quattlebaum
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 5, 2006

"Bursting with sizzle, this version is devilishly crafty. (author's note) (Folktale. 6-9)"
Tales of outsmarting the Devil are common; what sets this one apart is that it's rooted in a real place and is sparked by acrylic and pastel illustrations. Read full book review >
THE FIRE by Annette Griessman
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Along with giving firefighters due homage, this rare look at a house fire from the victim's perspective will draw strong reactions—and plenty of discussion—from children. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A child watches her house burn down in this heartrending if purposeful account. Read full book review >
MAY BIRD AND THE EVER AFTER by Jodi Lynn Anderson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Rare fun. (Fantasy. 11-13)"
The Wizard of Oz meets Beetlejuice in this tale of a ten-year-old loner who starts seeing ghosts, and then receives a plea for help that leads her into the Afterlife itself. Read full book review >
ANGEL SECRETS by Miriam Chaikin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"Includes a note about the stories, an author's introduction and sources and references. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
This charming collection of stories is based on Jewish legends that teach that the Holy of Holies created links between Heaven and earth. Read full book review >
THE BOY WHO RAN WITH THE GAZELLES by Marianna Mayer
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 2005

"A long author's note about wild children doesn't offer quite enough exegesis. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Stories of feral children abound, and they fascinate, but this one is disturbing in odd ways. Read full book review >
THE SUGAR CHILD by Monique de Varennes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Gore's pastel and acrylic paintings hold all the colors of marzipan and the translucence of sugar candy—a perfect foil for the tale's dulcet tenderness. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A lovely original tale as told to the author by her mother holds echoes of traditional stories of transformation. Read full book review >
VOICES OF THE TROJAN WAR by Kate Hovey
POETRY
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"With this and her previous Arachne Speaks (p. 84) and Ancient Voices (2001), Hovey offers a fresh and elegant take on the old stories for young readers. (bibliography) (Fiction. 9+)"
The classic tale of the Trojan War—about gods and men and fate—is here in full splendor. Read full book review >
THE LITTLE SLEEPYHEAD by Fran Manushkin
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: May 1, 2004

"And the last sentence makes it perfect for that last story before bed. (Picture book. 3-7)"
This little sleepyhead is an urchin with wild hair and an imp's mien, and he wants to sleep after playing all day. Read full book review >
THE PRINCESS MOUSE by Aaron Shepard
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"Prettily told, with sweet lessons about love and trust, no matter how odd the circumstances. (music notation, source notes) (Picture book/fairy tale. 6-9)"
Shepard (Master Man, 2001, etc.) retells an old Finnish tale about a very unusual way of choosing a very unusual bride. Read full book review >
THE SECRET OF THE GREAT HOUDINI by Robert Burleigh
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2002

"Houdini is a fascinating figure for all ages; this snapshot of one incredible feat and its witnesses will introduce children to the 'secret' of his success and may spur further exploration, and inspiration. (afterword) (Picture book. 7-10)"
Those expecting an easy answer to what Houdini's secret really was may be disappointed, but the truth is ultimately more satisfying: he worked incredibly hard, practiced, and believed in his ability. Read full book review >
BEHOLD THE TREES by Sue Alexander
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2001

"Timeline appended. (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-10)"
"Oak and almond, fig and olive, terebinth and palm, acacia and pomegranate, willow and tamarisk . . ." Read full book review >
THE CHRISTMAS RAT by Avi
by Avi, illustrated by Leonid Gore
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"The allegory is hammered in, but the building of tension is very skillfully done, and readers who enjoy horror and suspense will enjoy the descriptions of the ambiguous Anje and his deadly serious game. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Eric Andrick's Christmas visitor is anything but a warm and fuzzy bringer of holiday joys, in this suspenseful but heavy-handed allegory by a gifted writer. Read full book review >
WHO WAS BORN THIS SPECIAL DAY? by Eve Bunting
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Sweet, but not essential. (Picture book/poetry. 3-6)"
In time for the Christmas season, a brief picture-book poem from Bunting, for very young Christian listeners who will enjoy guessing: "Who was born on this special day?" Read full book review >
LUCY DOVE by Janice M. Del Negro
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

In an original story with Celtic roots, a superstitious laird believes that "a pair of trousers sewn by the light of the full moon in the graveyard of old St. Read full book review >
THE MALACHITE PALACE by Alma Flor Ada
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1998

From Ada (The Lizard and the Sun, 1997, etc.), an original fairy tale that is predictable, elevated to beauty by Gore's paintings. Read full book review >
KING KENRICK'S SPLINTER by Sally Derby
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 10, 1994

"Amusing, especially to anyone who has faced the unhappy tweezers. (Fiction/Picture book. 4-7)"
King Kenrick jumps out of bed on Hero's Day morning, only to get a splinter in his toe. Read full book review >
JACOB AND THE STRANGER by Sally Derby
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 1994

"An elegant piece of bookmaking; an enchanting, simple-seeming tale that contrasts provocatively with Aiken's The Shoemaker's Boy (above). (Fiction/Young reader. 6+)"
An intriguing, beautifully honed allegory concerning Jacob, known by his actions as kind, honest, even smart—yet lazy: ``I don't like to work,'' says he. ``I like to do as I please, to...lie in the grass watching the clouds.'' Still, he finds enough odd jobs to support himself, and one day a mysterious stranger offers him the easiest of tasks: to care for his potted plant for a florin a day, but ``You must return to me all that is mine. Read full book review >