Books by Eve Bunting

WASHDAY by Eve Bunting
by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Brad Sneed
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2014

"An appealing snapshot of rough-hewn life that might well make kids appreciate washing machines. (Picture book. 5-8)"
It's washday. That doesn't mean putting clothes in the washing machine and turning the knob or driving to the laundromat; it's 1889, when it's the old-fashioned way of getting clothes clean. Read full book review >
THE CART THAT CARRIED MARTIN by Eve Bunting
Released: Nov. 1, 2013

"An affecting snapshot of a tragic day. (afterword) (Picture book. 4-7)"
An old, unwanted cart becomes part of Dr. Martin Luther King's funeral procession. Read full book review >
BIG BEAR'S BIG BOAT by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 24, 2013

"This story is more than just a tale of sticking to your vision—it's a small world unto itself. A keeper. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Bunting and Carpenter (Little Bear's Little Boat, 2003) team again with a story riding on a Thoreau-vian sensibility with a Zen serenity. Read full book review >
HAVE YOU SEEN MY NEW BLUE SOCKS? by Eve Bunting
Released: March 5, 2013

"A great addition to the literature on ducks…or socks! (Picture book. 2-6)"
Where, oh where are Duck's new blue socks? Read full book review >
THE VOYAGE OF THE <i>SEA WOLF</i> by Eve Bunting
Released: May 1, 2012

""Listen now, ye belly-whackers," pirate fans are sure to savor this seafaring adventure and crave another in the series. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
Ahoy ye mateys! Clamber on board the Sea Wolf for a salty adventure. Read full book review >
 BEST SUMMER EVER by Eve Bunting
Released: April 1, 2012

"There are good lessons here, but here's hoping Bunting will deliver the next ones with a healthier helping of humor. (Early reader. 6-8)"
Frog and his friends are back (Frog and Friends, 2011) in another trio of early-reader tales, but this time they focus less on humor and problem solving and more on life lessons and manners. Read full book review >
BALLYWHINNEY GIRL by Eve Bunting
Released: March 6, 2012

"To balance this perspective, pair this with Mummies, Bones, and Body Parts, by Charlotte Wilcox (2000). (Picture book. 6-10)"
Maeve and her grandpa find an Irish bog mummy when they are out cutting peat. Read full book review >
FROG AND FRIENDS by Eve Bunting
Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"Here's to many more adventures for Frog and his friends, who are sure to go home with fans of Fluffy and Morris. (Early reader. 5-8)"
Frog and his friends Rabbit, Possum, Raccoon and Squirrel tickle funny bones, explore the world, solve problems and support each other in this trio of stories. Read full book review >
PIRATE BOY by Eve Bunting
Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"A sweet Runaway Bunny book for the pirate set. (Picture book. 4-8)"
While reading a book about pirates, Danny considers sailing away with them. But what if he wants to come home? Read full book review >
THE PIRATE CAPTAIN'S DAUGHTER by Eve Bunting
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2011

"A salty tang pervades this fast-paced pirate yarn, which provides a sometimes swashbuckling—but more often believably disgusting—perilous cruise across the high seas. (Historical fiction. 11-15)"
After her mother's death, 15-year-old Catherine's pirate-captain father allows her to cut her hair and pretend to be his son in order to join the crew of his ship. Read full book review >
MY DOG JACK IS FAT by Eve Bunting
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2011

"Skip this didactic drivel and skip rope instead. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Good intentions don't compensate for a heavy-handed approach in this latest effort to teach kids about the perils of obesity. Read full book review >
HEY DIDDLE DIDDLE by Eve Bunting
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2011

"Not the least of the music made here will be in a sing-along read-aloud, with accompanying guffaws to mark the time. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Bunting is perhaps best known for her skirmishes with heavy weather—racism, riots, homelessness, war—but that is not to deny her talent for pure whimsy, and that is what she delivers here. Read full book review >
WILL IT BE A BABY BROTHER? by Eve Bunting
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"Sweet and simple, this joins a handful of sibling-on-the-way books—including But I Wanted a Baby Brother, by Kate Feiffer and illustrated by Diane Goode (2010)—that traverse the same topic and extend, with great wit, beyond the new baby's arrival. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Bunting, who's known for her ability to artfully explore troubling issues, touches here on a lighter topic. Read full book review >
WALKING TO SCHOOL by Eve Bunting
FICTION
Released: Sept. 8, 2008

"This work slowly examines religious intolerance's impact on one individual, providing no easy resolutions. (Picture book. 7-10)"
Eight-year-old Allison is afraid to walk to school, a simple act made dangerous by "the Troubles" that wrack Northern Ireland. Read full book review >
OUR LIBRARY by Eve Bunting
Released: Aug. 18, 2008

"Librarians will probably find it hard to pass up. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Bunting wastes no time getting started in this energetic story about a small-town library in jeopardy. Read full book review >
MOUSE ISLAND by Eve Bunting
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2008

"Still, much pleasure can be found in Bunting's melodious prose—"He saw whales passing, their white breaths smoking against the sky"—as well as Catalano's lovely pastels. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Bunting's story of an island-dwelling mouse is a tale of longing written with great flair, but it is also a bit perplexing. Read full book review >
YOU WERE LOVED BEFORE YOU WERE BORN by Eve Bunting
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"A marvelous integration of color, image and verbal rhythm sure to delight and to become a must-purchase for newborns and their parents. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Bunting creates a universe of feeling using deceptively simple language. Read full book review >
THE MAN WITH THE RED BAG by Eve Bunting
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"A perceptive reader will anticipate the sad and simple answer long before the tidy ending reveals the reason that the contents of his bag are so important to him. (Fiction. 9-11)"
Bunting tackles a distasteful subject—the power of suspicion and prejudice over the minds of otherwise ordinary people—through the eyes of a 12-year-old on a post-9/11 spring-break bus tour with his grandmother. Read full book review >
EMMA’S TURTLE by Eve Bunting
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Young readers should relate to an odyssey close to home. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Emma's prized pet discovers a whole world in the backyard. Read full book review >
HURRY! HURRY! by Eve Bunting
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2007

"Highly recommended. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Bursting from the barn on the title page, a proud hen exhorts all critters to hasten in and witness the "tap, tap, tappity-tap" of the farm's incipient addition. Read full book review >
BABY CAN by Eve Bunting
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"Perfect for big brothers and sisters who might be a tad worried that the new baby will outshine them. (Picture book. 4-6)"
A young boy engages in innocent competition with his baby brother, with rewarding results. Read full book review >
REGGIE by Eve Bunting
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"As hard as it is to see a third-grader attaching himself to someone else's stuffed doll, it is impossible to accept that this sweet boy would keep it, especially in the face of a reward and a bawling little girl. (Fiction. 6-9)"
"How complicated could dishonesty be?" Read full book review >
ONE GREEN APPLE by Eve Bunting
FICTION
Released: June 12, 2006

"While making its point, this is a very gentle story about being new and different, with the author delivering her message in her classically subtle style. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Lewin's sunlit watercolors, full of space and shadow, are a lovely match for Bunting's simple but never simplistic story. Read full book review >
POP’S BRIDGE by Eve Bunting
Released: May 1, 2006

Practically bursting with pride, a lad tracks his "high-iron" father through binoculars as the Golden Gate Bridge goes up in this tribute both to the bridge itself, and to the teamwork that built it. Read full book review >
THAT’S WHAT LEPRECHAUNS DO by Eve Bunting
FANTASY
Released: Jan. 16, 2006

"Caldecott-winner McCully's sprightly watercolors bring prolific Bunting's cut-and-dried story to life. (Picture book. 4-9)"
The skies over the Irish countryside are clouding up: A rainbow is on the way. Read full book review >
MY RED BALLOON by Eve Bunting
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"Not sentimental but full of sentiment. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Bunting captures the tension, fear, anxiety and release in a small boy whose father is coming home from a Navy tour. Read full book review >
THE LAMBKINS by Eve Bunting
FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"The story won't suit everyone, especially since Bunting doesn't tie up all the loose ends, but there's enough menace to keep kids turning pages and rooting for the unwilling playthings. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Bunting offers an odd story of four plucky young people who are shrunk and forced to live in a dollhouse to satisfy a crazed woman's fantasy. Read full book review >
MY SPECIAL DAY AT THIRD STREET SCHOOL by Eve Bunting
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2004

In this fictionalized, but doubtless reality-based encounter, an author addresses a class of middle-graders, and it's all that a school visit should be. Read full book review >
I LOVE YOU, TOO! by Eve Bunting
FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2004

"Sweet's limpid and winsome images, in bright washes of color, balance the text without being cloying. (Picture book. 3-6)"
An adorable small volume is just the right size for little hands and says just the right words for little voices. Read full book review >
THE PRESENCE by Eve Bunting
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 22, 2003

"Memorable. (Fiction. 12+)"
Emotional depth resonates as 17-year-old Catherine fights off two kinds of haunting. Read full book review >
MY BIG BOY BED by Eve Bunting
FICTION
Released: Sept. 22, 2003

"A humorous, gentle look at a very common experience. (Picture book. 2-4)"
With a wagon full of toys and blankets in tow, one little boy makes the journey from baby to little boy as he moves from a crib to a big boy bed. Read full book review >
LITTLE BEAR’S LITTLE BOAT by Eve Bunting
ANIMALS
Released: May 19, 2003

"The tradition continues, both for the little boat and for Bunting, who just goes on delivering classy tales of youthful metaphysics. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Another healthy serving of charm and life lesson from the dependable Bunting, this time concerning destiny by way of a rowboat. Read full book review >
WHALES PASSING by Eve Bunting
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2003

"The real draw here, however, is Davis's true-to-life depiction of these magnificent creatures and the sea they inhabit, making this a satisfying introduction to ocean life and a good starting point for further research. (Picture book. 4-8)"
From a seaside cliff, a boy and his father observe killer whales in Bunting's poetic ode. Read full book review >
CHRISTMAS CRICKET by Eve Bunting
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 21, 2002

"The story can serve as simply a satisfying tale of an endearing insect who finds his way or, on a deeper level, as a parable of the faith journey. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Bunting (One Candle, below, etc.) shows her consummate talent as a storyteller in this simple but profound tale of a cricket who comes in from the cold to find warmth, light, companionship, and ultimately joy in his own little world. Read full book review >
GIRLS A TO Z by Eve Bunting
ABC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"A treasure that should be on every young girl's bookshelf and maybe on a boy's as well. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The sky's the limit for Bunting's (Sing a Song of Piglets, p. 1218, etc.) assemblage of vivacious young ladies who imagine themselves in every profession under the sun. Read full book review >
ONE CANDLE by Eve Bunting
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Grandpa's comment would be problematic in any event, but out of the mouth of the husband of a Holocaust survivor it is troubling indeed. (Picture book. 6-8)"
This Hanukkah story about a family's ritual reenactment of Grandma and great-aunt Rose's Hanukkah spent at Buchenwald many years ago during the "bad time" propounds a disturbing view of the Holocaust. Read full book review >
SING A SONG OF PIGLETS by Eve Bunting
POETRY
Released: Sept. 23, 2002

"Charming, buoyant, and year-round fun. (Picture book/poetry. 2-5)"
A celebration of the seasons by a veteran author and a Caldecott Medalist (Mirette on the High Wire, 1992). Read full book review >
THE BONES OF FRED MCFEE by Eve Bunting
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Fred is no namby-pamby skeleton; this is spookiness with attitude and a great new addition to Halloween shelves. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A brother and sister bring home a plastic skeleton from the harvest fair, hang him in their sycamore tree, and name him Fred McFee. Read full book review >
WE WERE THERE by Eve Bunting
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 17, 2001

"An uneven execution, but an eye-opening, consciousness-raising addition to the plethora of "animals at the manger" tales nonetheless. (Picture book. 6-8)"
The indefatigable Bunting (Gleam and Glow, above, etc.) looks "beyond the light / to darkness / and the corner" where shadows hide spider, scorpion, bat, rat, cockroach, and snake, all of whom have come to join the cattle and other livestock gathered around baby Jesus. Read full book review >
GLEAM AND GLOW by Eve Bunting
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Though characters' names place them in an Eastern European milieu, this is a universal story that testifies to life rising from the ashes. (Picture book. 6-9)"
In this aptly titled, lovely effort from Bunting (We Were There, below, etc.), humanity simply shines through. Read full book review >
PEEPERS by Eve Bunting
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"1119, etc.) cuts his palette loose to let autumn sing. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Two sons of a leaf-peeper tour-bus operator can't get enough of mocking their father's clients as they ooh and aah over autumn's glory in the northern New England countryside. Read full book review >
THE SUMMER OF RILEY by Eve Bunting
FICTION
Released: May 31, 2001

"At best, a lesson that there are at least two sides to every issue. (Fiction. 8-12)"
JIN WOO by Eve Bunting
ANIMALS
Released: April 23, 2001

"This will find a ready audience with many adoptive families, especially those preparing to adopt Asian babies. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Among the prolific Bunting's many talents is a propensity for distilling complex social issues into accessible picture books that begin to make subjects such as the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, adult illiteracy, and homelessness more understandable to younger children. Read full book review >
LITTLE BADGER’S JUST-ABOUT BIRTHDAY by Eve Bunting
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2001

"A thoughtful example of generosity, an unbroken circle of giving and taking, and, when she's not being coy, richly atmospheric illustrations. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Bunting's Little Badger is as sweet and good as they come, and it is to her credit that the wee beast doesn't dissolve into a saccharine puddle, despite a push in that direction from Pham, who has a fondness for Disneyesque doe eyes and shy glances. Read full book review >
RIDING THE TIGER by Eve Bunting
Released: March 19, 2001

"Most general readers—kids and their parents, grandparents, and older siblings—will find this simplistic and preachy. (Picture book. 6-9)"
After a long string of career hits from Bunting (The Wall, 1990, Smoky Night, 1994, etc.), we have a miss: a bald, ham-handed allegory cautioning kids against gang membership and peer conformity. Read full book review >
WHO WAS BORN THIS SPECIAL DAY? by Eve Bunting
POETRY
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Sweet, but not essential. (Picture book/poetry. 3-6)"
In time for the Christmas season, a brief picture-book poem from Bunting, for very young Christian listeners who will enjoy guessing: "Who was born on this special day?" Read full book review >
DOLL BABY by Eve Bunting
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 21, 2000

"Although Bunting handles the subject matter skillfully and sensitively, it's so obviously neither fish nor fowl that it likely will remain tucked away on a shelf rather than finding its way into the hands of young girls like Ellie. (Fiction. 11-14)"
In keeping with her willingness to take risks, Bunting (The Memory String, see below, etc.) tackles another "difficult" subject in this poignant, but unusual, cross between a picture book and a problem novel. Read full book review >
THE MEMORY STRING by Eve Bunting
Released: Aug. 21, 2000

"Bunting (Doll Baby, see above, etc.) has found an original way to tell an old story about making room for new memories. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A string of treasured buttons becomes a metaphor for a young girl's struggle to accept her new stepmother in this poignant exploration of love and loss. Read full book review >
SWAN IN LOVE by Eve Bunting
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2000

"While this is an agreeable story, it's not entirely successful, never quite becoming the magical tale it strives to be and of questionable interest to children. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Bunting (A Picnic in October, 1999, etc.) pens a sweet story about a swan in love with the wooden swan figurehead on a little boat. Read full book review >
A PICNIC IN OCTOBER by Eve Bunting
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"This sense of refuge drifts through Bunting's text, as fundamental and natural an element of life as are the everyday incidentals she braids into the story and all of which are exquisitely caught by Carpenter's vivid illustrations. (Picture book. 5-10)"
Bunting (I Have an Olive Tree, p. 719, etc.) once again explores larger themes through a quiet family story. Read full book review >
BLACKWATER by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 30, 1999

"Ingrid Tomey makes the horns of a similar dilemma much sharper in Nobody Else Has To Know (p. 890), while Marion Dane Bauer, of course, charted a more subtle route in On My Honor (1986). (Fiction. 10-12)"
In an unusually weak story from the prolific Bunting, a teenager wavers between staying silent and confessing his responsibility for a half-serious prank that results in two deaths. Read full book review >
I HAVE AN OLIVE TREE by Eve Bunting
Released: May 31, 1999

"The double-page opening of Sophia and her mother before the olive tree vibrates with emotion—a passionate marriage of word and text. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Both language and image are gorgeous in this affecting story of generations from Bunting (Some Frog!, 1998, etc.) and Barbour. Read full book review >
SOME FROG! by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"The plot, paced more like an easy reader than a picture book, and with a large typeface and ample atmospheric paintings, make this appeal to emerging readers, especially those facing their own feelings of loss and abandonment. (Fiction. 6-10)"
A classroom frog-jumping competition results in a lesson in understanding and forgiveness, as a young boy learns that parents aren't perfect. Read full book review >
SO FAR FROM THE SEA by Eve Bunting
Released: April 20, 1998

"Together, text and illustrations create and sustain a mood of reflection and reminiscence suited to the topic. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Political history becomes personal narrative in this evocative story about a family's connection to Manzanar, one of the WW II camps where Japanese-Americans were interned. Read full book review >
THE DAY THE WHALE CAME by Eve Bunting
Released: March 1, 1998

"That a child would be sensitive to the whale's plight may prove a timeless notion, but it feels more 1998 than 1920, the date on a nickel viewed close up. (Picture book. 6-10)"
When a train pulls into town carting a dead whale, the citizens of Johnstown, Illinois—one in a Model A—eagerly hand over their buffalo-head nickels and dimes to Captain Pinkney for a chance to view the dead behemoth. Read full book review >
DECEMBER by Eve Bunting
Kirkus Star
by Eve Bunting, illustrated by David Diaz
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Seen in almost every spread in a glowing palette of rose and gold, she draws the eye and the heart again and again. (Picture book. 5-8)"
An understated holiday story with dazzling art, by the duo behind Smoky Night (1994) and Going Home (1996). Read full book review >
MOONSTICK by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 30, 1997

"Expertly and beautifully told. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Bunting (The Pumpkin Fair, p. 947, etc.) turns a sensitive eye to Sioux culture, depicting it truthfully and realistically while incorporating into the book a heartening message to any child whose ancestral ways have passed (even temporarily) into obscurity. Read full book review >
DUCKY by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 22, 1997

Even with the considerable talents of Bunting (Moonstick, p. 1108, etc.) and Wisniewski (Golem, 1996), this first-person news-based story of what happens to a plastic bathtub toy when he and the other 28,999 tub toys in his crate are washed overboard during a storm at sea doesn't quite make the transition to the picture-book form. Read full book review >
THE PUMPKIN FAIR by Eve Bunting
Released: Aug. 18, 1997

"Christelow valiantly trudges along, mustering as many pumpkin-related scenes as she can and stuffing them with comic characters and events, but even she begins to flag near the end. (Picture book. 3-6)"
The reason for this determinedly jolly book seems to be to provide educators with a fall title that invokes autumn harvest themes and even jack-o'-lanterns—yet it never mentions Halloween. Read full book review >
I AM THE MUMMY HEB-NEFERT by Eve Bunting
Released: April 1, 1997

"A startling shot of a contemporary child underscores Heb-Nefert's dulcet lament in this compelling work. (Picture book. 6-11)"
From Bunting (On Call Back Mountain, p. 138, etc.), a remarkably succinct and knowing "autobiography" of a mummy that provides the essence of life in the Egypt of the pharaohs, and which is strikingly illustrated by Christiana (The First Snow, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >
ON CALL BACK MOUNTAIN by Eve Bunting
Released: March 1, 1997

"Bunting (The Blue and the Gray, 1996, etc.) presents complex issues in a way that even very young readers will grasp. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Joe and Ben anxiously await the annual summer return of their friend Bosco Burak, the elderly lookout in the fire tower that stands on the peak above their family's cabin. Read full book review >
THE BLUE AND THE GRAY by Eve Bunting
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Offering only hints of the issues over which the war was fought, this is not a book to read without preparation, but it is a worthy complement to books such as Patricia Polacco's Pink and Say (1994) and Karen Ackerman's The Tin Heart (1990). (Picture book. 7-10)"
Bunting adds to her series of picture books with serious themes (Smoky Night, 1994, etc.) with this account of an unnamed Civil War battle framed within a present-day story of two young boys, one black, one white, whose new homes are being constructed within view of an unmarked battlefield. Read full book review >
GOING HOME by Eve Bunting
by Eve Bunting, illustrated by David Diaz
Released: Sept. 30, 1996

"An affectionate, but not exceptional offering. (Picture book. 5-8)"
From the Caldecott Medal—winning team behind Smoky Night (1994), the story of a migrant family returning to Mexico for the Christmas holidays. Read full book review >
SECRET PLACE by Eve Bunting
by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Ted Rand
Released: Aug. 16, 1996

"Luminous watercolors juxtapose the concrete and smoke of warehouses and wharves in an evocative and deeply satisfying work. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Bunting (Train to Somewhere, p. 65, etc.) writes about a small boy who discovers a secret place—a small patch of wildlife—at night in the river that runs through a cacophonous, polluted urban center—"Close by is a freeway where cars and trucks boom, and a railroad track with freight trains that shunt and grunt." Read full book review >
SOS TITANIC by Eve Bunting
Released: May 1, 1996

"Suspense, adventure, romance, and a protagonist who comes of age under terrible circumstances combine in a novel that survives the tragedy at its center without diminishing it, and somehow remains upbeat. (Fiction. 12+)"
From a familiar event, Bunting (Train to Somewhere, p. 65, etc.) creates a gripping story that will have readers struggling right along with its hero on the doomed Titanic. Read full book review >
MARKET DAY by Eve Bunting
Released: March 30, 1996

"Although the rambling story never really meshes—this is a leisurely and chaotic visit—there's so much warmth, ebullience, and jaunty charm in Berry's good-humored paintings that every page offers a richly satisfying eyeful. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Bunting (Dandelions, 1995, etc.) evokes an old-fashioned Irish Market Day in an era in which it took all day to spend a penny. Read full book review >
TRAIN TO SOMEWHERE by Eve Bunting
Released: March 18, 1996

"A reminder that the good old days were not so idyllic; this book will have a place in the history curriculum, but it's also an involving read-aloud. (Picture book. 6-10)"
A moving piece of Americana from a veteran team (Fly Away Home, 1992, etc.), introducing the orphan trains of the 19th and early 20th century to a picture-book audience. Read full book review >
DANDELIONS by Eve Bunting
by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Greg Shed
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"A memorable book, for the way its characters struggle with unhappiness, and slowly overcome it. (Picture book. 5-10)"
It would be hard to come up with a tale of western settlers that's not a clichÇ, but Bunting (Spying on Miss Muller, p. 553, etc.) has done it. Read full book review >
SPYING ON MISS MULLER by Eve Bunting
Released: April 24, 1995

"The one false note is Jessie's belated and rather facile acceptance of her father's alcoholism (somehow linked to Miss Müller's acceptance of her own father's Nazism), but it's not enough to spoil a good story well told. (Fiction. 9-13)"
Miss Müller — half-Irish, half-German — is a favorite of the girls at Belfast's Alveara School until the start of WW II. Read full book review >
THE IN-BETWEEN DAYS by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 30, 1994

"Powerful and poignant. (Fiction. 8-12)"
"The ice looks so still, but I know everything is moving out there, the pieces fitting themselves together," says 11-year-old George of the frozen harbor beyond his house. Read full book review >
NIGHT OF THE GARGOYLES by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 19, 1994

"Caldecott medalwinner Wiesner's charcoal drawings are as breathtaking as Bunting's prose in this wildly successful attempt to prove what we've always suspected: The gargoyle lives. (Picture book. 4-8)"
At night a motley assortment of gargoyles come alive to "creep on stubs of feet," to fly "if they have gargoyle wings, straight up to lick the stars with long stone tongues," or to land in "sleeping trees." Read full book review >
A DAY'S WORK by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 19, 1994

"A fine, moving story that manages to convey an important moral message without sounding preachy or didactic. (Fiction/Picture book. 5-8)"
Award-winning author Bunting's (Night of the Gargoyles, p. 1122, etc.; The In-Between Days) persuasive moral tale about a young Mexican boy in contemporary California who lies in order to help his family. Read full book review >
NASTY, STINKY SNEAKERS by Eve Bunting
Released: June 30, 1994

"Curiously, the icky appeal, kid-tickling story line, and lesson about integrity and fairness here all closely parallel those in Julie Ann Peters's half-as-long The Stinky Sneaker Contest (1992). (Fiction. 8-11)"
When 10-year-old Colin's dirty sneakers disappear from outside his apartment door, he's sure the culprit is Jack, his chief rival in a contest for the most offensive footwear (the prize: two new pairs of Slam Dunkers). Read full book review >
FLOWER GARDEN by Eve Bunting
Released: April 1, 1994

"A simple, pleasing episode with a contemporary subtext. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A young girl carries a carton of potted flowers from the supermarket home and up the stairs; she and her father replant them in a window box and light candles on a birthday cake to surprise Mom when she comes wearily home from work. Read full book review >
SUNSHINE HOME by Eve Bunting
Released: March 21, 1994

"A poignant slice of life in the 90's; Timmie's successful intervention sends the message that even a child can offer real consolation. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Timmie and his parents make their first visit to Gram at a nursing home; she's had to move there since "the doctors said she needed full-time nursing care." Read full book review >
SMOKY NIGHT by Eve Bunting
Released: March 1, 1994

"An outstandingly handsome book that represents its subject realistically while underplaying the worst of its horrors; an excellent vehicle for discussion. (Picture book. 4+)"
A noted author (Fly Away Home, 1991) brings all her empathy and creative skill to another timely topic: an inner-city riot. Read full book review >
SOMEDAY A TREE by Eve Bunting
Released: March 22, 1993

"Deliberately poignant but more plausible and skillfully written than most of the recent spate of consciousness-raising books about trees; Himler's sensitive, evocative watercolors make a fine complement to the lyrical, perceptive text. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The team who collaborated on The Wall (1990) and Fly Away Home (1991, both ALA Notables) takes on another contemporary issue in a story about a beloved tree, an ancient oak, succumbing to pollutants. Read full book review >
COFFIN ON A CASE by Eve Bunting
Released: Oct. 30, 1992

Here, Bunting brings a glib, easy style to the tale of Henry Coffin, son of a partner in the detective agency "Coffin and Pale." Read full book review >
THE DAY BEFORE CHRISTMAS by Eve Bunting
Released: Oct. 19, 1992

"An evocative vignette. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Seven-year-old Allie goes on a special outing, by train, with her grandfather to see The Nutcracker—her first trip to the theater. Read full book review >
OUR TEACHER'S HAVING A BABY by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 21, 1992

"The watercolor illustrations perfectly capture the postures, moods, and expressions of the children and the liveliness of their classroom. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A warm—but unsentimental—story about the excitement, anticipation, and anxieties experienced by a first-grade class whose teacher has a baby during the school year. Read full book review >
SUMMER WHEELS by Eve Bunting
Released: April 1, 1992

"An inspiring story with broad appeal and a handsome format. (Fiction/Young reader. 6-11)"
In a neighborhood where few kids own bikes, the "Bicycle Man" (based on a real person) loans out his lovingly renovated collection, with just two rules: the bikes must be returned by four, and if they're damaged, the borrower must help make repairs. Read full book review >
SHARING SUSAN by Eve Bunting
Released: Oct. 30, 1991

"A gripping but flawed story, then, to provoke vigorous discussion. (Fiction. 10-13)"
Bunting explores what happens after two couples learn that their daughters were switched as babies in the hospital. Read full book review >
JUMPING THE NAIL by Eve Bunting
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Satisfying suspense that unobtrusively incorporates wholesome values while drawing a credible picture of ordinary teens enthralled by their own escalating frenzy. (Fiction. 12-17)"
Impelled by a heady blend of peer pressure and vainglory, a group of recently graduated California teens revive the local stunt of leaping from a 90-foot cliff into the sea where some of their predecessors died. Read full book review >
NIGHT TREE by Eve Bunting
by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Ted Rand
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"A warm Christmas card of a book, in the best sense; Rand's moonlit watercolors are sure to be as popular as the conventional but warmhearted story. (Picture book. 3-8)"
A classic nuclear family shares their own Christmas Eve tradition, leaving their conventionally decorated ranch house in Dad's pickup to deck a live tree in the woods with popcorn and fruit for the forest creatures. Read full book review >
THE HIDEOUT by Eve Bunting
Released: April 1, 1991

"Largely contrived, and, though Andy's uneasiness with his mother and Paul's sexuality is clearly compelling, any realistic exploration of his perfectly believable feelings is pushed aside to make room for the hollow, feel-good ending. (Fiction. 8-12)"
In a plot device that is becoming familiar, a new stepparent is the reason that a child—here it's 12-year-old Andy, in San Francisco—ventures into the streets, where he discovers that the world is more wicked than anything he has faced at home. Read full book review >
A PERFECT FATHER'S DAY by Eve Bunting
Released: March 18, 1991

"Lively illustrations extend to fun."
As a Father's Day treat, Susie takes her dad to what she fondly imagines are all his favorite places: a fast-food restaurant (for which she graciously allows him to pay), the duck pond, the merry-go-round, etc. Meanwhile, Mom has fixed a celebratory meal—a "surprise" that Susie has igenuously revealed. Read full book review >
FLY AWAY HOME by Eve Bunting
Released: March 18, 1991

"Like The Wall (1990), an outstanding presentation of a serious topic for young children."
"My dad and I live in an airport. That's because we don't have a home and the airport is better than the streets. Read full book review >
SUCH NICE KIDS by Eve Bunting
Released: Oct. 22, 1990

"As they do wth stagy accident films in driver's ed, readers are likely to shrug this off as just too much to be believed."
Jason, psyched for his dinner date with a girl named Destiny, is dismayed when the plans of his friends Pidge and Meeker intrude. Read full book review >
OUR SIXTH-GRADE SUGAR BABIES by Eve Bunting
Released: Oct. 15, 1990

"Thoughtful, well-crafted, and sure to be popular."
Hoping to prove that she is responsible enough to be left in charge of her four-year-old half-sister, Vicki takes on the new class project with high expectations: she will care for her 5-lb. bag of sugar, "Babe," as if it were a real baby. Read full book review >
IN THE HAUNTED HOUSE by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 24, 1990

"A satisfying addition to the Halloween repertoire."
A trip through a scary haunted house where ghosts and witches loom, a mummy with a winking eye lies on a bed, a skeleton bunts from a closet, and a vampire sleeps in the bathtub—all described in engaging rhyme: "The roof space is creeping and crawling with things,/Things that have horns and raggedy wings." Read full book review >
THE WALL by Ronald Himler
Released: April 23, 1990

"Still, a moving introduction."
A young boy visits the Vietnam War Memorial with his father, finds his grandfather's name, and leaves a picture of himself at the wall's base. Read full book review >
NO NAP by Susan Meddaugh
illustrated by Susan Meddaugh, by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 23, 1989

"Irrepressible Susie is endearingly true to life; Meddaugh's cartoon-like illustrations catch the situation's humor, as well as Mom's consternation when she comes home to a mess—and the still wide-eyed child."
With Susie left in his care, Dad spends the afternoon trying to get her tired enough to nap—until Dad falls asleep. Read full book review >
THE GHOST CHILDREN by Eve Bunting
Released: April 17, 1989

"For a more intelligent fictional use of senior-citizen-created junk that proves to be valuable as art, see Levin's The Trouble with Gramary (1988)."
After their mother dies, Matt, 13, and his sister Abby, 5, come to live with their great-aunt Gerda in a canyon near Los Angeles, bringing little except a portfolio of their mother's paintings. Read full book review >
THE WEDNESDAY SURPRISE by Eve Bunting
Released: March 20, 1989

"A heartwarming, inspiring story; readers may well find that when his mother's accomplishment brings tears of joy to Dad's eyes, there are tears in theirs as well."
Grandma and narrator Anna are planning a wonderful surprise for Dad's birthday. Read full book review >
IS ANYBODY THERE? by Eve Bunting
Released: Oct. 1, 1988

"Better readers may find the pace a bit slow, but all will empathize with Marcus' dread of confronting an empty house alone."
A suspense story starring a 13-year-old latchkey kid. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 19, 1988

"A fine companion to Barbara Cohen's Molly's Pilgrim for broadening the Thanksgiving message—and a compassionate depiction of the plight of many of our recent would-be immigrants."
A moving fictional presentation of the perilous voyage of a group of Caribbean refugees to this country. Read full book review >
A SUDDEN SILENCE by Eve Bunting
Released: April 10, 1988

"By including several minor characters whose alcoholism is pivotal to the plot, she emphasizes the tragedy that alcohol can inflict on innocent bystanders and other family members."
A moving piece of Americana from a veteran team (Fly Away Home, 1992, etc.), introducing the orphan trains of the 19th and early 20th century to a picture-book audience. Read full book review >
GHOST'S HOUR, SPOOK'S HOUR by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 1, 1987

"A pleasant story about self-reliance; sure to be useful."
In welcome contrast to the many books like There's a Nightmare in My Closet, here's a realistic story about the resolution of nighttime fears. Read full book review >
SCARY, SCARY HALLOWEEN by Jan Brett
Released: Oct. 20, 1986

"A good book to read aloud between visitors on that special scary night."
Strong, clear pictures in vivid autumnal colors provide the setting for a troupe of traditional creatures—skeleton, ghost, vampire, werewolf, witches, goblins, gremlins, devil, and even a creature in a winding sheet—cavorting about for Halloween. Read full book review >
Released: March 17, 1986

"The writing is smooth and the characters appealing."
This companion volume to Karen Kepplewhite is the World's Best Kisser takes another breezy look at preteen life. Read full book review >
THE MOTHER'S DAY MICE by Jan Brett
Released: March 17, 1986

A part of the Bunting/Brett holiday picture book series, the painless, if obvious, story of what three mice give their mother on her day. Read full book review >
MONKEY IN THE MIDDLE by Eve Bunting
Released: April 15, 1984

"Amiable and nimble, if featherweight."
No folk-tale inevitability, only the merest figment of Eastern imagination—but an amusing bit of buffoonery, lightly cartooned to match. Read full book review >
THE TRAVELING MEN OF BALLYCOO by Eve Bunting
Released: April 29, 1983

"Fair enough, and sufficiently well turned, with Zemach's dancing, gesturing figures and floating musical notes sustaining the lilt—but there's a bit of a tired, machine-made air to the story, and the pictures too seem simply to be supplying what's called for."
The title and the cover, with the three unglamorous traveling men jigging and waving merrily in a meadow, tell you what to expect from Bunting's brogue-laden tale of the three musicians—Cathal wailing out "The Hunt" on a penny whistle, Sean "bent near in two" over his fiddle, and Young Jimmy playing the melodeon—who travel about, calling all Ireland home, and never stop to marry. Read full book review >
THE VALENTINE BEARS by Jan Brett
Released: Feb. 1, 1983

"A banal conceit, and unappealing pictures."
For just one moment, lightning almost strikes: Mrs. Bear, settling in for the winter, set the alarm early—for February 14—so she and Mr. Bear could, for once, celebrate Valentine's Day. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 1, 1982

"Apart from the conundrums (and an ingenious balloon-stunt), altogether flat—and tacky even so."
It's hard to reconcile the Eve Bunting of, say, The Happy Funeral (p. 867, J-181) with the author of crude teenage suspensers like The Waiting Game and this. Read full book review >
THE HAPPY FUNERAL by Eve Bunting
Released: Sept. 1, 1982

"The light-fingered, gray-toned pencil-and-wash drawings display the same combination of sensitivity, economy, and finesse."
The rightness of death for the deceased, the painfulness for the survivors—conveyed with exceptional directness in the context of an unfamiliar culture. Read full book review >
THE EMPTY WINDOW by Judy Clifford
Released: Oct. 15, 1981

"Though dread of the dying is natural enough, nothing else here is—down to the heavily shadowed, doom-laden, black-and-white pictures."
In a slim volume of picture-book dimensions is a seventh-grader's story of catching a wild parrot for a dying friend—a mismatch that would doom the book even if it were worthier than it is. C.G.'s brief narrative, however, is all problem, portent, and patent symbolism. Read full book review >
GOOSE DINNER by Howard Knotts
Released: Sept. 8, 1981

"A little too offhand altogether for the ostensible purpose, unfortunately."
A string of anecdotes about Goose—"the terror of our backyard"—that does ultimately turn into a story of sorts. . . but never does sound as if it were written as an easy-reader: the overall structure is too loose, the sentence-structure is too idiosyncratic, the words are too out-of-the-way ("farrier," "demented")—and there are quite a few contractions. Read full book review >
THE WAITING GAME by Eve Bunting
Released: March 1, 1981

"However, the two-bit characterization doesn't prepare readers to accept that final goody-goody decision."
A 46-page, short-story-scope record of the day Los Angeles high-school football player Luther spends waiting for an offer from Ohio State. Read full book review >
YESTERDAY'S ISLAND by Stephen Gammell
Released: Nov. 15, 1980

"A drag."
One-dimensional, one-note hokum. Read full book review >
THE CLOVERDALE SWITCH by Eve Bunting
Released: Oct. 24, 1980

"Run-of-the-pod."
This begins with the world flashing negative (black is white, etc.), as in a scarier Shirley Jackson story; then it has robot duplicates from space replace John's girlfriend and seven other people in Cloverdale (a motif familiar from some well-known blockbusters and less-known duds); and it ends with a simple tribute to love that could only mark a juvenile version. Read full book review >
THE ROBOT BIRTHDAY by Marie DeJohn
Released: April 17, 1980

"Otherwise, pretty flat."
Mom makes the robot as a birthday gift for twins Pam and Kerry shortly after she's divorced and they've moved to a new house. Read full book review >
DEMETRIUS AND THE GOLDEN GOBLET by Michael Hague
Released: April 1, 1980

"Fancy furbelows, an empty core."
A large, elaborate production in the revivalist mode—double-page spreads in color, single-page, decoratively framed drawings in black and white—all more or less from the Maxfield Parrish era. Read full book review >
BLACKBIRD SINGING by Eve Bunting
Released: March 31, 1980

"If the issue between the parents weren't so stereotyped, or if the mother were more fully characterized or less of a twit (Marcus' good memory involves her fanciful vision of a unicorn), then the son's problems might seem more than a textbook sketch."
To Mom, the blackbirds are something to watch with rapture and dream of painting. Read full book review >
Released: March 19, 1980

"And if so, how?"
An earnest fable that is too ponderous and too shadowy to be effective. Read full book review >
ST. PATRICK'S DAY IN THE MORNING by Jan Brett
Released: March 1, 1980

"Bunting tries too hard for color and imagery without supplying any narrative structure or incidents; and Brett's green and black drawings are just drab."
Somewhere in Ireland, on Saint Patrick's day in the morning, Jamie wakes up early, resenting that he's too small to walk in the parade. Read full book review >
THE BIG RED BARN by Howard Knotts
Released: April 23, 1979

"That's a sidelong reference to stepmother Emma, seen in affectionate consort with Susie on the page before (and in the picture opposite); but the inference is both too fragile and too facile to make this diffuse mood-piece into a satisfactory story—even if it weren't an easy reader."
A tenuous construct, barely a story, with none of the usual aids or lures for a beginning reader. Read full book review >
WINTER'S COMING by Howard Knotts
Released: April 7, 1977

"Not resonant enough to be memorable, this does strike a quiet, expectant note, and though Knotts' scratchy, cross-hatched, winter-gray drawings lack the poetry of his illustrations for Barnstone's A Day in the Country (1971), they do their share to maintain the tone."
An even-toned catalog of the preparations for winter observed by a small boy and girl around their farm. Read full book review >
THE BIG CHEESE by Eve Bunting
Released: Feb. 28, 1977

"Boring."
The Misses Tillie and Bee Culpepper buy a big cheese one day, but cheese attracts mice. . . so they buy a cat. . .the cat wants milk. . . so they buy a cow. . . the cow needs grass. . . so they buy a meadow. . . and onward and downward into terminal ennui. Read full book review >
ONE MORE FLIGHT by Diane DeGroat
Released: March 15, 1976

"One more diluted Dorp Dead?"
A chronic runaway from foster homes and from the Center where he's spent most of his eleven years, Dobby is lucky enough on his latest flight to be picked up by nineteen-year-old Timmer who lives in a barn and takes care of injured birds for the Audubon Society. Read full book review >
BARNEY THE BEARD by Eve Bunting
Released: March 1, 1975

"A fluffy diversion, light as those drop biscuits Barney has to weigh down to keep them from floating away."
In the town of Conn in the County of Cork there lived two bakers and both were named Barney. Read full book review >