Book List

Best Book Apps of 2012: For Younger Readers

With its distinctive look, a great drawing element that's actually appropriate to the story and a moral that values...

DRAGON BRUSH

The story of a magical dragon brush that can bring painted objects to life casts its own spell.

Bing-Wen, a slender rabbit from a poor family, loves to paint. His luck turns when he helps an old woman with an overturned cart and is awarded a paintbrush made from the whiskers of a dragon. Bing-Wen finds that everything he paints comes to life, even if the transformations don't always turn out the way he plans. When he tries to help his village by painting sources of food, the emperor is not pleased and arrests the boy. What follows is a clever reversal, in which Bing-Wen gives the emperor what he wants but in a way that saves Bing-Wen and his village. Characters are rendered in subtle, evocative colors and with appropriate, often funny detail. Artwork throughout is subtle and elegant, with Chinese-inspired touches like menu buttons in the shape of paper lanterns. But the app's greatest strength is the way it allows children to "fill in" Bing-Wen's paintings then watch them come to life. The text throughout is as clear and plainspoken as the narration, with good, punchy vocabulary. A separate painting feature is equally well-produced.

With its distinctive look, a great drawing element that's actually appropriate to the story and a moral that values cleverness over power, Bing-Wen's app is as rare and magical as the dragons he loves to paint. (iPad storybook app. 3-8)

Pub Date: May 23, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Small Planet Digital

Review Posted Online: June 27, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2012

This spectacular synthesis of elements creates magic on the iPad. Parents and kids won’t want to tear themselves away.

LITTLE FOX MUSIC BOX

A melodious music app combines artistic creativity with top-notch execution.

This superb app offers three songs plus a musical "play space" that all feature gorgeous, detailed illustrations, high-quality music and sound effects, and first-class animations. “London Bridge” and “Old MacDonald” are voiced in unaffected, sweet kids' voices, while "Evening Song" is sung mellifluously by an adult. The creators clearly paid attention to detail in all of the elements, with stupendous results. In “Old MacDonald,” the scenery and animations change to reflect the season, which is controlled by viewers by turning a wheel. The “London Bridge” scene is reminiscent of a Rube Goldberg contraption, with wacky details abounding. “Evening Song” has a quieter feel, but there is plenty to discover and animate. The Studio play space (a hollow tree) is populated with an array of sounds, like frogs singing, knitting needles clacking and spiders scuttling, all of which can be set to three background rhythms, while Fox dances center stage. There is so much creativity here that it can’t even fit onto the screen—when viewers scroll from side to side, they discover even more treasures. The only minor quibble is that the sound effects sometimes compete slightly with the music, particularly in the quieter "Evening Song."

This spectacular synthesis of elements creates magic on the iPad. Parents and kids won’t want to tear themselves away. (iPad music app. 3-10)

Pub Date: March 15, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Shape Minds and Moving Images GmbH

Review Posted Online: June 20, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2012

Though the story is simple, even obvious, it takes flight because of the ambitious design work, the kind of thing that can...

MR. SANDMAN

"FEAR OF THE DARK"

A moody, beautifully rendered dreamscape, this app about conquering a fear of the dark takes full advantage of the iPad's capabilities.

In a small cottage, a nameless boy is being put to bed, and Mummy tells him the Sandman will soon help him off to sleep. After the Sandman visits, a mysterious owl leads the boy through landscapes and starry skies to learn why there's no reason to be afraid of nighttime. Scary things, like a wicked, twisted witch, turn out to be more normal objects like a squirrel in an old tree. Dark silhouettes against dense, textured backgrounds match the story’s tone beautifully. There are neat surprises, like moons that grow to reveal hidden things, a maze of purple clouds that must be flown through and a simple but brilliant navigation wheel that brings up all the features through easy-to-access icons. But perhaps the thing this app has to offer most to readers, and to the state of storybook apps, is its joyous transitions. On one page, readers brush away the last page to get to the next. On another, sleepy eyelids come together to blackout a page before the next one is illuminated by starlight. It's all accompanied by a lush, classical soundtrack. 

Though the story is simple, even obvious, it takes flight because of the ambitious design work, the kind of thing that can only be pulled off as an app like this. (iPad storybook app. 3-7)

Pub Date: Aug. 4, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: hocusbookus

Review Posted Online: Oct. 8, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2012

A lesson to be sure, but delivered in a lighthearted blend of equally lively art, sound and animation.

THE HOUSE THAT WENT ON STRIKE

In an episode both funny and pointed, a family of slobs receives an ultimatum from their filthy house and its disgusted appliances.

Decrepit outside and dirty inside (“I was ashamed and depressed: was this all a cruel jest? / While my people relaxed, I was totally stressed”), House recruits a squad of equally neglected appliances to eject the oblivious residents until they show more respect. Though wordy enough to require manual scrolling on some screens, the rhymed narrative trots along briskly—particularly in the zesty reading provided by former U.S. presidential candidate Pat Schroeder—to a final proper show of remorse and a vigorous “Clean Revolution.” Easy-to-spot interactive elements jiggle occasionally and are colored more brightly than the angled, informally drawn cartoon backgrounds. They include a plate-spitting dishwasher with a ferocious snarl, a plaintive (and thoroughly grease-encrusted) oven and other touch-activated figures, a roving X-ray spotlight for seeing through House’s walls, ancient food items that can be flicked out of the fridge into a garbage can and miscellaneous general litter to sweep away with a fingertip.

A lesson to be sure, but delivered in a lighthearted blend of equally lively art, sound and animation. (iPad storybook app. 4-8)

Pub Date: July 24, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Jumping Pages

Review Posted Online: Aug. 20, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2012

With a format that includes science, math, art, music and reading, it still manages to be what learning should be—fun.

OVER IN THE OCEAN

IN A CORAL REEF

This beautifully illustrated counting and singalong app version of the 2004 book introduces young readers to the creatures of the coral reef.

The original book is enhanced by simple, well-executed animations. With a touch or a jiggle, kids can send baby fish swimming, puffer fish puffing and squid squirting ink. After a one-by-one introduction to the featured coral-reef babies, from one octopus to 10 seahorses, a "Find the Babies" game brings them all back together for one final count. Backed by music and ocean sounds, the text is read or charmingly sung by the book's multitalented author, or readers can choose to read to themselves. True to the publisher's mission to connect children to nature, the app includes photographs and factual information about the sea life in the story. Additional pages introduce the author, illustrator, developer and publishers. Artist Canyon explains how she created the illustrations with polymer clay and tools from her kitchen in an accessible way that encourages children to create their own art projects. In fact, counting skills and science aside, her vibrant pictures of the coral-reef habitat are enough to make this app appealing to readers of all ages.

With a format that includes science, math, art, music and reading, it still manages to be what learning should be—fun. (iPad informational app. 4-8)

Pub Date: March 16, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Dawn Publications

Review Posted Online: May 9, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2012

Children with wheezles and sneezles of their own will sympathize with the droopy monster and perhaps feel a little less...

EVEN MONSTERS GET SICK

Zub looks like a bad bargain until his new young owner, Harry, realizes that the monster isn’t sad and boring but actually ill.

Resembling a big orange Wild Thing in the angular cartoon illustrations, Zub just lies about, groaning and dripping unusually gross-looking slime—until his young friend, with a flash of insight, calls upon his “Uncle Doctor Bob” for a house call (“Zub was nervous because some monsters are afraid to go to the doctor”) and learns that the creature has a cold. A little TLC and Zug and Harry are rocking out with Rock Hero, sharing ghost stories at Kid Camp and even setting out on a pirate treasure hunt. The options and interactive features are simple, smooth and satisfyingly varied. Fledgling readers can either tackle the first-person tale themselves or listen to an expressive child narrate over pleasant background music. A fingertip moves Harry and Zug through two easy mazes, elicits moans and cheers with taps, catapults cans of soup into the monster’s mouth, sets a frog band to playing a hornpipe and, after a closing hug, ignites fireworks in a nighttime sky.

Children with wheezles and sneezles of their own will sympathize with the droopy monster and perhaps feel a little less anxious about doctor visits, too. (iPad storybook app. 4-6)

Pub Date: July 5, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Busy Bee

Review Posted Online: Aug. 1, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2012

A winner: beautifully illustrated, nicely designed and solidly informative.

BATS!

FURRY FLIERS OF THE NIGHT

A seamless blend of realistic graphics, high-resolution photography and well-chosen interactive features makes for an inviting introduction to bat behavior and types.

In each of the seven topical sections, Carson’s short overview commentary is supplemented by captions and touch-activated windows. These show, for instance, a map of major bat colonies with touch-activated sub-windows or what a human skeleton with bat wings would look like and how it would articulate. The screen-filling nighttime scenes are sometimes sequential; one series leads viewers in stages into the Bracken Bat Cave in Texas, for instance, to view a huge mound of guano. Hidden bats (always specific, identified types) on several screens can be “spotted” with a fingertip. The “Seeing with Sound” chapter features a “record” button that allows readers to see their own bat screeches in action, and the closing animation is a tilt-controlled bat’s-eye “flight” over a moonlit landscape. The on-screen slider that appears to signal that the next page has loaded may prompt too-quick digits to flick before the narrator is quite through, but its bottom-to-top action is pleasingly different from the usual site-swiping motion as well as suiting its aerial subject. Overall, navigation is smooth, and the special features enhance rather than distract from the presentation.

A winner: beautifully illustrated, nicely designed and solidly informative. (iPad informational app. 6-9)

Pub Date: Jan. 30, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Bookerella and Story Worldwide

Review Posted Online: Feb. 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2012

CLARA BUTTON AND THE MAGICAL HAT DAY

What begins as a simple story about a girl trying to restore her grandmother's torn hat becomes an unexpectedly detailed look at fashion treasures from a famous British museum.

Clara Button, who wears colorful buttons that change with a tap, loves to design hats as much as her late grandmother, who was a milliner, did. When one of her grandmother's hats is torn by a bratty brother, Clara is distraught. But amid the collections at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, she gets help for her hat and finds many other lovely objects from its extensive collections. The story is meticulously illustrated, with so much detail that many subtle touches (a child waving in a background photo, for instance) are nearly lost, even on an iPad's high-resolution screen. While interactive elements and animations are present throughout—readers can touch the screen at any time to get a splash of multicolored buttons—they don't distract from Clara's quest or what she finds at the V&A. The real-world art objects, expertly woven into Clara's visit, end up filling an exquisite final page. The app's cultural pedigree shouldn't be surprising, as de la Haye is a dress historian and former curator at the V&A. The rest of the app's features, from its no-nonsense narration to its musical accompaniment, are top-notch. Not every reader will share Clara's strong affinity for fashion, but there's no denying the beauty of the showcased. (iPad storybook app. 4-12) 

 

Pub Date: July 26, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: MAPP Editions

Review Posted Online: Aug. 27, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2012

It's likely young readers who pick up this well-made app will be learning about both Bollywood and red pandas for the first...

LALOO THE RED PANDA

The adventure of a lost, rare red panda cub trying to find his way home is expertly packed with Indian culture, energetic artwork and engaging characters.

Laloo, who looks more like a fox than a traditional, burly, black-and-white panda, loves bugs, to the puzzlement of those around him. One day, a poacher traps and takes Laloo, but the cub is able to escape. From there, Laloo tries to get back to his family and is aided by a famous dog actor named Scrilla and his friends. The journey is made entertaining by its settings: Laloo crashes the set of a Bollywood movie, runs through a market where the vendors are "selling silk scarves and spicy eggs in sizzling pans," and travels home on a decorated purple train. He also collects bugs he finds along the way; readers tap the bugs to add them to a collection. The text could be cleaner in terms of punctuation and grammar, but the story itself is fun, the narration is sprightly and Laloo's persistent worry that he doesn't fit in is certainly universal. But it's the presentation of life in India that makes the app most worthy of recommendation. The clean, beautifully colored artwork is vibrant and inviting. Laloo's world has lots of characters, perhaps too many for one story. Some barely get a page or two, leaving room for further tales of Laloo and his friends.

It's likely young readers who pick up this well-made app will be learning about both Bollywood and red pandas for the first time—and they will be glad they did. (iPad storybook app. 3-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 12, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Laloo LLC

Review Posted Online: Oct. 22, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2012

The 230 photos—often-breathtaking, in-the-moment portraits—are accessed via pins on a world map, as a slide show or as a...

CHILDREN AROUND THE WORLD

A photo gallery–as-app is light on features yet becomes a moving visual statement communicated through the faces of hundreds of kids from around the world.

The 230 photos—often-breathtaking, in-the-moment portraits—are accessed via pins on a world map, as a slide show or as a gallery with a simple horizontal bar as navigation. Each photo has a caption that can be accessed by tapping a word-balloon button. The one-line descriptions are light on detail, yet evocative. "Wearing his last meal as lipstick, a full child takes a break from dining and greets a visitor to his simple home in a riverside African village," reads a caption for a photo taken in Juffure, The Gambia. But it's the faces of the children themselves that are most compelling. Whether they appear to be bored or giddy, engaged in activity or posing for a foreigner's camera, their emotions are sometimes as clear as what the backdrops tell us about their living conditions. The cumulative effect gives readers (especially young ones) a small sense of the scale of the Earth and its many inhabitants. If there's anything missing, it's a cleverer way to browse the images than flipping through them one by one, pointing on a clunky map or rolling a too-tiny thumbnail bar. And, though the app is visually overstuffed, there's no sound at all. It's as if the kids all went eerily silent when even a few sound clips would have enhanced the app greatly.

Pub Date: Jan. 7, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Banzai Labs

Review Posted Online: Feb. 15, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2012

LOLA AND LUCY'S BIG ADVENTURE

Spectacular illustrations and digital diversions drive this sweet tale of two Vermont bulldogs in search of a purpose.

Having learned that dogs are supposed to have jobs and, from a peek online, that bulldogs were bred to hold bulls’ noses, Lucy and Lola embark on a cross-country quest. It takes them from Wall Street’s bronze bull to a dairy farm, South Dakota (in search of “Sitting Bull”), a western rodeo and other bullish locales—all of which are laid out on a retractable map of the United States. A laid-back California bull finally lets them take an anticlimactic grab (“His nose was cold, wet and not very exciting. ‘I guess it isn’t the same if the bull lets you,’ Lucy said”). He then clues them in before a happy closing reunion with their frantic human family: “A dog’s job is…to bring comfort and joy to the human heart.” The dogs’ wrinkled mugs steal the show in the photorealistic visuals, but the plethora of interactive elements aren’t far behind. Along with the map, a multi-entry encyclopedia of dog breeds, two paint boxes and 13 dexterity-based minigames, 286 animations or sound effects respond to screen taps (as an incentive to start over, readers are presented at the end with a tally of how many they found). Furthermore, the narrative is available in either “Picture Book” or “Chapter Book” versions, with optional audio readings and an auto-play option. A doggy road trip with nary a dull moment…no bull. (free sampler in iTunes) (iPad storybook app. 5-9)

 

Pub Date: Oct. 25, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Pinkerton Road

Review Posted Online: Dec. 3, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2012

Step right up to this truly spectacular offering; it will undoubtedly delight ladies, gentlemen and children of all ages.

PICCADILLY'S CIRCUS

Every element of this app shines in a story about circus performers who learn to appreciate the talents of others.

This winning interactive tale is a highly successful marriage between tradition and technology. The pleasantly simple illustrations function much like a flannel board, though characters often stay anchored while doing things like swaying, jumping or balancing. When the ringmaster, Mr. Piccadilly, falls ill (and sneezes everyone off screen), the other animals and performers realize that the show must go on. Readers can dress various characters in the ringmaster's clothes as they all contemplate who will be the group’s temporary leader. Each argues that his or her job is the most difficult in the circus, which obviously qualifies them to be ringmaster. After the bear wins the coveted position, everyone else swaps tasks for the night to prove that others’ jobs are easy. Of course they aren’t, and valuable lessons are learned. There’s plenty of interactive and literary creativity infused throughout the story. Chirping crickets accompany a spotlight that reveals the bear’s stage fright; a little dog is shot out of a cannon, sails through the top of the circus tent and then parachutes to safety. And the app’s narrator tells the well-crafted story with an exceptional dramatic flair. 

Step right up to this truly spectacular offering; it will undoubtedly delight ladies, gentlemen and children of all ages. (iPad storybook app. 2-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 6, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Ink Robin

Review Posted Online: Oct. 10, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2012

Brief, but loaded with appeal for younger readers and pre-readers.

LITTLE LOST RABBIT FINDS A FAMILY

An abandoned bunny doesn’t stay homeless for long in this understated, simply illustrated import.

Venturing out into “their” vegetable patch with baskets under their arms one day, the Bunnybig family hears loud noises (“CATACRACK, CRASH, CRASH!”). Investigating, they see the neighboring rabbits being run off by tractors. Spotting a droopy refugee on the other side of the garden fence the next morning, the littlest Bunnybig quickly enlists help from everyone to dig a hole and to adopt a new Bunnybig into the clan. In the spare art, which looks like cut-paper collage with bits of added brushwork, a tap activates twitching bunny ears or a drifting cloud, makes figures move a few inches or nibble on a carrot, along with like restrained animations. Optionally read by a sympathetic narrator, the equally spare text is available in English, Spanish or Catalan. Though navigation isn’t as seamless as it might be—touching small carrots in the lower corners moves the story ahead or back, but an unlabeled sun in the middle flips the story back to the opening screen, willy-nilly—and at just 12 scenes, the tale seems barely begun before it’s done, the overall feeling of warmth and welcome will leave all but the most hardhearted audiences smiling.

Brief, but loaded with appeal for younger readers and pre-readers. (iPad storybook app. 3-5)

Pub Date: March 31, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: iLUBUC

Review Posted Online: May 2, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2012

Like the board book it is based on (Bizzy Bear, Let's Go to Work! 2012), this app has only a few pages, but each one is...

BIZZY BEAR BUILDS A HOUSE

From the Bizzy Bear series

Kids who love trucks and construction will identify with Bizzy as he dons his hard hat and "helps" the crew build a house.

Lots of attention has been paid to making this app easy for little ones to use, and young readers will have fun participating in all aspects of the construction site. Narrated in a British accent by child actors, this brightly illustrated app allows the reader to bulldoze, mix cement and dig a hole for a foundation. A blue dot blinks to help readers locate the many interactive elements. Page turns and the home-screen icon must be tapped twice to activate, which neatly prevents accidental navigation, and while they occasionally blink to suggest readers move on, they never rush things, allowing readers to move along at their own pace. Highlighted words follow the text in Read and Play mode, and in Read to Myself, readers can adjust how long the text remains on the screen. With the exception of a slightly annoying loop of background music, the sound effects, from truck engines and bird chirps to brick laying and a flushing toilet, are nicely done and add an extra level of fun.

Like the board book it is based on (Bizzy Bear, Let's Go to Work! 2012), this app has only a few pages, but each one is packed with features that encourage budding builders to linger as long as they like. (iPad storybook app. 6 mos.-3)

Pub Date: June 21, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Nosy Crow

Review Posted Online: Aug. 1, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2012

Clean, simple, seamless—just right for the nursery-school set or children with special needs.

LOST LARRY

From the Larry Lizard series

A little green lizard will trail a fingertip home in this mini-Odyssey, the third of Larry’s interactive outings.

Pointing fingers in the illustrations and overt instructions in the rhymed text (“Trace a path with your finger right on the screen / Larry will follow once the path’s been seen”) provide uncommonly broad hints for this app's toddler audience. They guide the lost lizard through very simple zigzag mazes, over stepping stones, and past gatherings of anthills and beehives to, at last, a dark little cave just right for a curled-up snooze. The story is read (optionally) in soothing Aussie accents over quiet sighs or chuckles from Larry and other easily identifiable sounds. The low-key narrative accompanies a set of broadly brushed cartoon scenes—in each of which taps will also make numbers appear briefly in sequence, a fish leap, an echidna suck up ants, or buzzing bees fly off as Larry crawls or hops out of view. An unobtrusive icon at the top of each portrait-mode screen opens a menu with a link back to the start, a toggle for the audio narration and other options.

Clean, simple, seamless—just right for the nursery-school set or children with special needs. (iPad storybook/dexterity app. 1-3)

Pub Date: March 7, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Wasabi Productions

Review Posted Online: April 16, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2012

Luli's love of colors comes across as both genuine and infectious.

COLORS THAT LULI LOVES

An appropriately bright primer on the major colors, this tour through the rainbow seems ideally suited to toddlers learning to associate words with objects.

Luli, who has red, spaghettilike hair and appears to be made of clay, enjoys colors the way most people enjoy the changing seasons. On each page, she interacts with similar clay-made objects of a distinct color, from red and orange through the spectrum to white and the black of nighttime that ends the story. In Luli's world, "Yellow paints everything shiny and bright / Bananas and sunflowers, a special delight." As ever-present small butterflies flutter, a yellow monkey holds a large banana, and Luli basks under a huge, buttery sun. Luli's clothing and activity change on each page (but not her hair). The color list is by no means complete, but the app feels about the right length, and few children will quibble when they see Luli sailing down a rainbow at the story's conclusion. While the text, all flutters and sugar with cream, may seem oversweet to adult readers, it is age-appropriate for children young enough to be learning to name colors. The app's narration is clunkily hidden in a set of lips that must be activated manually on each page, but understated animations and the well-composed clay imagery more than make up for that misstep.

Luli's love of colors comes across as both genuine and infectious. (iPad storybook app. 18 mo.-5)

Pub Date: June 7, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Rotem Omri & Rachel Mislovaty

Review Posted Online: July 22, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2012

Flo and her unusual offspring easily capture readers’ hearts in this story of faith and love. Not bad for a chicken who...

THE CHICKEN AND THE EGG

A cluck-worthy story about a chicken with magical maternal instincts succeeds with flashes of visual wit and a lovable main character.

Flo is a sad chicken who can't lay eggs like all the others on her farm. Her sad, heartfelt "Awww" when she looks at her empty nest tells readers all they need to know about her hopes and dreams. Amusingly, Flo tries an exercise machine, getting shot out of a cannon and, of course, a book called "How to Lay an Egg" to fulfill her dreams. When a stone tumbles down a hill and lands in her nest, she takes it for an egg. Poor Flo. But when Flo's life is threatened by a wicked-looking rodent, the stone, surprisingly, hatches to save the day. While the chickens in the story are adorably drawn, and some of the tale is played for laughs, Flo's longing and the love she shows when her wish is finally granted are poignantly played. Backgrounds and objects in the app are skillfully rendered, and the app's unobtrusive soundtrack and lilting narration (voiced by a British child) are delightful. While features are minimal, Flo's pure joy ("Egg! Egg! My very own egg!") and a happy, well-deserved ending amply compensate.

Flo and her unusual offspring easily capture readers’ hearts in this story of faith and love. Not bad for a chicken who can't lay eggs. (iPad storybook app. 3-8)

Pub Date: April 30, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Plendy Entertainment

Review Posted Online: July 18, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2012

A simple, lovely lullaby.

GOODNIGHT SAFARI

A mellow bedtime book about baby animals preparing to sleep.

In this charming, sweetly illustrated book, toddlers can “join the goodnight safari” and help the animals get ready for bed. Tap a baby zebra, and he stops frolicking in the tall grass so he can join his mother. The young giraffe needs help reaching the leaves in a tree so she can finish her dinner. Readers can also dunk the speckled rhino to wash off his muddy back and help the brown monkey swing into her “bed” in an adjacent tree. The rich, lush illustrations burst with color, and the fuzzy, socklike texture of many animals adds to their appeal. Each page offers just enough interaction to hold the interest of rambunctious little ones but not so much that they become overstimulated. There’s even an optional background sound-effect loop that functions much like soothing white noise—a plus when the aim is to bring the energy level down a few notches. Once tasks are completed, an arrow appears to navigate to the next page. Touch elements and page turns can be a bit sluggish (it takes repeated taps to submerge the rhino in water, for example), but overall it’s not terribly disappointing—after all, the point is to slow down and chill out.

A simple, lovely lullaby. (iPad storybook app. 1-4)

Pub Date: Jan. 11, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Polk Street Press

Review Posted Online: Feb. 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2012

A darling first app for little ones to share with their own moms.

MY MOM'S THE BEST

A simple, well-executed animal mommy/baby love story for the youngest crowd.

 “My mom’s the best because she gives me big hugs,” says the narrator, and with just a touch, a big, fuzzy brown bear and baby bear appear. Touch the bear, and she hugs her baby just a little bit tighter. Illustrator Whatley’s affable, whimsical animal pairs virtually pop off the screen’s solid backgrounds. A mommy parrot teaches her nestling to sing, an elephant mom “makes bathtime fun” with a big splash of water, a penguin mommy feeds her baby a huge fish, and an upside-down mommy bat tucks her baby in under her wings (the text is upside down here, too, which is a nice touch). There's enough silliness and humor here to engage parents, too. Navigation is available on each page, and the high-quality narration, animations, music and sound effects pair with the simple text perfectly. 

A darling first app for little ones to share with their own moms.   (iPad storybook app. 1-5)

Pub Date: May 2, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: SnappyAnt

Review Posted Online: June 13, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2012

Keep an eye on this kid; one can only hope he’ll sneak his way into another story or two.

SNEAKY SAM

A brief but endearing tale about a mischievous little boy.

This app proves the notion that an interactive storybook need not be super slick or brimming with tricks to leap the “average” bar. The story’s focus, of course, is Sam’s sneakiness, which is demonstrated in profoundly simple ways: He hides from his mother; he rides his scooter through a flock of pigeons; he turns the hose on the family cat; and at night, he sneaks into his parents’ bed to grab “a good night cuddle” (which they lovingly provide). Talib’s trichromatic illustrations are brimming with primitive creativity, from the characters’ hair to the wide variety of flowers and objects that decorate the book’s pages. Interactive features are minimal and basic, but when combined with the stimulating illustrations and the clear-cut, well-written storyline, all three add up to a satisfying reading experience. Bonus features include a miniature matching game, a virtual sticker book and a “Find Sam” activity that finds him hiding in a different place every time it’s played. While Sam could easily be dubbed a ne’er-do-well, readers are left with the impression that he’s simply a harmless boy who, for the most part, enjoys stirring up a little unconventional fun.

Keep an eye on this kid; one can only hope he’ll sneak his way into another story or two. (iPad storybook app. 2-5)

Pub Date: Aug. 10, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Sneaky Sam Productions

Review Posted Online: Sept. 26, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2012

A very well-balanced offering that both educates and entertains.

KODEE'S CANOE

Little polar bear Kodee and his friend Raccoon learn about echoes in this suitably simple storybook for preschoolers and early readers.

Nitrogen Studios—known for providing the stunning computer-generated animation in the wildly popular Thomas and Friends television/DVD franchise—has transitioned into the app market with a notable effort. It is perhaps best described as a mashup of stunning graphics, smooth animation and gentle interaction. Kodee and Raccoon hear someone yell, “Hello,” but they can’t figure out who’s saying it. After deciding the voice is coming from a nearby island, the duo sets out in the titular canoe to investigate. Readers can help them put on life jackets, summon flying fish and prompt a number of delightful movements and responses from various animals and insects. In the end, Kodee and Raccoon discover that the voices they heard were their own, and the concept of echoes is introduced. Readers are subsequently invited to make their own echoes with a record/playback feature. In addition to the app’s (optional) professional narration, various individuals can also record up to three versions of the story, which can be saved for later playback. The only downsides are an annoying pop-up triggered when leaving the echo chamber or going to the home screen that continually requests a review in the app store (the “Do not ask again” button doesn’t halt the appeals) and the fact that it will not work on iPad 1.

A very well-balanced offering that both educates and entertains. (iPad storybook app. 2-6)

Pub Date: June 30, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Nitrogen Studios

Review Posted Online: Aug. 9, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2012

A winning app that could easily be deemed the jazz version of The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra. Smooth.

A JAZZY DAY

This highly user-friendly primer gives kids both a macro and micro lesson about jazz music.

Papa kitty wakes up his children with the exciting news that they’re going to visit a jazz band. After a yummy breakfast, off they go. First, they encounter a hip raccoon who plays a mean bass. Brother and sister cat also observe a fox playing drums, a goose tickling the ivories and a squirrel playing a groovy guitar riff. The story explores a wide variety of instruments, including the vibraphone, trumpets, trombones, three different saxophones, the flute and the clarinet. Turning the page activates instrument demos, though some launch more quickly than others. Touching band members elicits repeated demo performances, and if tapped all at once, they play at the same time. The young felines offer commentary when tapped, and the text itself provides helpful insight into the basic theory of jazz and the various categories of instruments that comprise a jazz band (brass and rhythm sections, for example). One page even highlights various sections as they chime in. The clever bonus games prompt kids to guess which instrument is making which sound, and it also quizzes them by asking them to match the names to the instruments.

A winning app that could easily be deemed the jazz version of The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra. Smooth. (iPad storybook app. 2-8)

Pub Date: Jan. 13, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: The Melody Book

Review Posted Online: March 5, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2012

FRANKLIN FROG

From the Rounds series

Three generations of frogs demonstrate the circle of life.

This first installment in Nosy Crow’s new Rounds series of biology apps for preschoolers is actually a hybrid of sorts. The story offers plenty of frog facts (though perhaps not the “100’s” listed on the developer’s website), but there’s also fictional banter that gives the frogs a bit of character. The story begins with Franklin’s journey across land and through pond. Tap him, and he’ll say things like “Frogs like to live in damp places,” and “I don’t like to be too hot or too cold.” Readers can help him jump into the water, swim, catch food and find a place to hibernate, and they can even tag along as he finds a mate and procreates (though the latter is implied, not explicit). When Franklin’s mate lays eggs, little fingers can swipe predators away and even help hatch a tadpole. The same story repeats twice—in its entirety—featuring two of Franklin’s descendants. The soothing background music and the crisply British narration/dramatization are nearly identical to the developer’s previous offerings, and sound effects are both plentiful and charming. In keeping with the clever concept of the series title, the simple illustrations are comprised completely of circles or portions of circles.

A winner. (iPad informational app. 2-5)

Pub Date: Aug. 8, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Nosy Crow

Review Posted Online: Sept. 24, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2012

RITA THE LIZARD

Bursting with life in its clever visuals and antic sense of play, an abundance of activity is on offer in this story about a fun-loving red lizard.

Rita, the titular flat, red lizard, is first seen lounging on the beach as a paper sailboat passes by. "Rita thinks she is a chameleon just like her Uncle William," but her bright, unchanging color and strange habits (like snoring while she sleeps on a zebra) don't exactly make her blend into the background. The identity crisis is solved with the help of her animal friends, and the whole affair concludes with a festive dance party as Rita celebrates who she really is. The message is carefully inserted into dense layers of gorgeously textured art and buoyed by plenty of surrealist touches. A giraffe wears boots; a duck flies by, calmly embedded within a hot-air balloon; and a photo on a wall suddenly sprouts a long, stringy mustache. The app's animations and extra features are beautifully presented and fit right in with the rest of the story. If that weren't enough, each page has an optional countdown that tells readers exactly how many interactive goodies are available. Activate all of them and an award notification pops up that, remarkably, doesn't break up the flow of the story. Rita's realization that being a lizard is great is carried effortlessly by all the terrific visual asides along the way. (iPad storybook app. 3-10)

 

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Irene Blasco Grau

Review Posted Online: Dec. 10, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2013

A low-key, appealingly unpretentious twist on a familiar folk tale.

B.B. WOLF

A revised “Little Red Riding Hood,” with unusually simple and effective illustrations and interactive features.

Fong suspends small figures drawn in thin, scribbly lines against speckled sepia backgrounds free of extraneous detail, creating narrative movement for her retelling with one or two discreet spiral buttons in each scene. These activate a gesture, cause a line of text to appear or some similarly simple change when tapped. She also transforms the original tale’s cautionary message. She follows the traditional plotline until Red Riding Hood enters Grandma’s house, but then she puts the wolf in front of the stove in the kitchen, where he indignantly denies any wrongdoing and hands Red the basket of goodies she had left in the woods. In comes Grandma to make the lesson explicit (“What did I tell you about judging people by their appearances?”) and to join child and wolf at the table for “a nice dinner of porkchops.” Consonant with the overall sparseness of art and prose, page advances are manual only, and there are neither looped animations nor audio tracks.

A low-key, appealingly unpretentious twist on a familiar folk tale. (iPad storybook app. 5-7)

Pub Date: May 15, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Debbie Fong

Review Posted Online: June 27, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2012

Smooth pans of the double-screen illustrations and interactive features that are as high in child appeal as the...

THE EDIBLE SUIT

Rapid tapping calls up cascades of pigs, pork chops and more from this lightly edited version of Lear’s hilarious “The New Vestments.”

A bold fashion statement goes badly awry when a gent dressed in meat, candy and other edibles tries to take a stroll. Out hurtle “all sorts of beasticles, birdlings and boys” to send him reeling home stark naked. Higham depicts the onslaught in discreet but humorous watercolor cartoons, enhanced here by touch-activated animal calls and animations. In many scenes, veritable showers of items sail into view, usually with loud pops or other noises, as fast as little fingers can hit the screen. Based on a print version from 1986 with a few of the original verse’s lines rearranged and minor word changes (“jujubes” become “jelly beans,” a “girdle” switches to a “belt”), the rhyme can be read silently or by optional narrators in a Dutch translation or in British or North American accents. Other options include manual or auto advance, a slider to control the sprightly background music’s volume and, for added value, a separate letter-matching word game and savable coloring “sheets.”

Smooth pans of the double-screen illustrations and interactive features that are as high in child appeal as the sidesplitting plot add up to an unusually successful crossover to the digital domain. (iPad storybook app. 6-9)

Pub Date: Feb. 23, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Tizio BV

Review Posted Online: March 13, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2012

A triumphant blend of classic literature and tablet technology.

OWL AND CAT

Feline and fowl profess their love for one another in this winning adaptation of Lear's popular 1871 nonsense poem.

Owl and pussycat take a moonlight ride in a “beautiful pea green boat.” Owl pulls out his guitar and openly declares his affection for the cat, singing “O lovely Pussy! / O Pussy my love / what a beautiful Pussy you are.” The cat, clearly swept off her feet, suggests that they be married. Since they dont have a ring, they sail away “for a year and a day” until they come across a pig with a ring in his nose. He agrees to sell his ring to the two sweethearts, and a turkey subsequently performs their marriage ceremony. Everything about this app is well-done. The graphics are simple, deeply colorful and laser crisp, and the characters are appealingly goofy. Each slightly animated page holds one or more interactive elements that are basic, yet pleasing, particularly in their tactile fluidity. Sound effects are well-placed and strikingly clear, perfectly garnishing the overall effect rather than overwhelming it. Though original music accompanies the text throughout the book, developers intentionally excluded voice-overs to encourage parents to read to their children. Although labeled as "free" in the app store, that applies only to the first few pages. Readers who want the whole poem will need to make an in-app purchase.

A triumphant blend of classic literature and tablet technology. (iPad storybook app. 2-5)

Pub Date: March 9, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: The Nitro Lab

Review Posted Online: April 8, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2012

In a sea of interactive homogeny, this is a rare gem.

LIL' RED

A refreshingly distinctive take on the classic European fairy tale.

The plot and substance of this story are nearly identical to what has been told for centuries. In this version, however, developers have assembled a winning trio of music, illustrations and interactions that help breathe new life into the familiar tale. All graphics are grayscale, peppered with various shades of red, providing atypically lovely visual scenery. The wolf is deliciously sinister, lurking around and rubbing his paws as he anticipates eating Lil’ Red, who has anime eyes that occasionally shoot readers a would-you-hurry-up-and-tap-things look when the screen is idle for too long. The story is told with visual speech balloons, meaning there are no words, only simple graphics that ably move the story along (and also remove any potential age or language barriers.) Much as in Peter and the Wolf, various instruments represent each character, including a string bass (wolf), a clarinet (Grandma) and xylophone (Lil’ Red). There are other cool nuances, including a mushroom patch that yields trombone tones, and a host of small interactions involving both creatures and objects. Great attention has been given to detail—a creaking swing or the delicate sound of footsteps, for example—that fortify the overall experience.

In a sea of interactive homogeny, this is a rare gem.   (for iPad 2 and above) (iPad storybook app. 1-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 27, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Brian Main

Review Posted Online: Nov. 12, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2012

Hard not to smile at this, whether it’s read as a tribute to communal living or a simple bit of rustic foolery.

TOWER DEAREST

A KIND RUSSIAN FAIRY TALE

Lively, brightly colored illustrations featuring a full kit of touch-activated details infuse this traditional cumulative tale with infectious cheer.

The titular “tower” is really only a tree-stump house with a bell hanging outside to ring, a colorfully decorated window to fling open, and enough room to accommodate not only Burrow Mouse, but Treesong Frog, Runaround Rabbit, Foxy Fox and Greyside Wolf too as each comes along. Not, alas, Bigpaw Bear though, whose weight causes the whole house to collapse with a mighty crash. Undeterred, the happy housemates instantly build a new and bigger dwelling to share. The animals, dressed in comfy country duds, gesture and identify themselves at a tap on (nearly) every screen. Along with panning and zooming for a 3-D effect, the cartoon scenes also include touch- and tilt-sensitive items, from dandelion puffs to a sun/moon toggle. Though the English or Russian text/audio narrative tracks can only be selected at the beginning, an icon on each screen allows readers to switch the audio and sprightly background music on or off, and the overlaid cartouches of small type text can be minimized with a tap to leave the art unobstructed.

Hard not to smile at this, whether it’s read as a tribute to communal living or a simple bit of rustic foolery. (iPad storybook app. 5-7)

Pub Date: Aug. 3, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: TerryLab

Review Posted Online: Sept. 26, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2012

Good-natured fun and some well-designed interactive elements distinguish this fairy-tale remake.

ALTERNATIVE STORY: RED RIDING HOOD

Over-the-top and hokey, but somehow this “choose your adventure” fairy tale works by never taking itself too seriously

A sultry fairy narrates the story of Little Red Riding Hood and offers choices along the way for viewers, the most dramatic of which is “Did the Wolf help Little Red Riding Hood?” If viewers choose yes, the Wolf gives Little Red Riding Hood a piggyback ride to Grandma’s, and they all have a nice afternoon snack together. If viewers choose no, Grandma and Little Red Riding Hood are the Wolf’s afternoon snack. The illustrations have the feel of a shoe-box diorama, with props, characters and scene elements dropping in from the top or sliding in from the sides of the screen. There are enjoyable and unexpected interactive options on each page to keep viewers interested, as well as some tongue-in-cheek laughs. When Grandma is about to be eaten by the Wolf, a camera with a red X across it materializes to cover the horrors viewers might imagine are happening behind it. The text is in a pull-down menu, so viewers can only see the text or the illustration, not both at the same time. Text and narration are offered in Spanish, French or English, and the repetitive music is blessedly optional. Navigation is easily accessible on each page, and 14 scene puzzles are available.

Good-natured fun and some well-designed interactive elements distinguish this fairy-tale remake.   (iPad storybook app. 4-8)

Pub Date: March 24, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: ZigZag Studio

Review Posted Online: May 2, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2012

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