BABY FACE

A BOOK OF LOVE FOR BABY

Six babies populate these six poems, paeans to the momentous events of baby life: first steps, a bath, going out in the carriage, getting teeth, going to bed. Asking, “what shall you chew?” for “Baby Teeth” the narrator notes fondly, “How about some building blocks? / I think you love those most.” The verses fall gently upon the ear, and Goode’s watercolor, pencil and gouache pictures—squiggly babies and softly hued mamas, dads, grandparents—gambol on white backgrounds. Dogs, cats, toys and favorite blankets also figure prominently. These are definitely baby-rocking rhymes for parents, babysitters or older siblings to read aloud to the giggling bundle of joy in their charge. A few have the potential of memorization with a chance of becoming a familiar family favorite. (Picture book. 0-3)

Pub Date: March 4, 2008

ISBN: 978-1-4169-4909-1

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Paula Wiseman/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2008

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Leave the hopping to Peter Cottontail and sing the original song instead.

THE ITSY BITSY BUNNY

An Easter-themed board-book parody of the traditional nursery rhyme.

Unfortunately, this effort is just as sugary and uninspired as The Itsy Bitsy Snowman, offered by the same pair in 2015. A cheerful white bunny hops through a pastel world to distribute candy and treats for Easter but spills his baskets. A hedgehog, fox, mouse, and various birds come to the bunny’s rescue, retrieving the candy, helping to devise a distribution plan, and hiding the eggs. Then magically, they all fly off in a hot air balloon as the little animals in the village emerge to find the treats. Without any apparent purpose, the type changes color to highlight some words. For very young children every word is new, so highlighting “tiny tail” or “friends” makes no sense. Although the text is meant to be sung, the words don't quite fit the rhythm of the original song. Moreover, there are not clear motions to accompany the text; without the fingerplay movements, this book has none of the satisfying verve of the traditional version.

Leave the hopping to Peter Cottontail and sing the original song instead. (Board book. 1-3)

Pub Date: Jan. 5, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-4814-5621-0

Page Count: 16

Publisher: Little Simon/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: Jan. 20, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2016

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Toddlers are better served by a chorus of the original, accompanied by the finger motions

THE ITSY BITSY DUCKLING

From the Itsy Bitsy series

Yet another remake of the classic fingerplay.

Burton and Rescek need to find a new song to parody or, better yet, come up with something original. As in earlier remakes—The Itsy Bitsy Pilgrim, The Istsy Bitsy Bunny, The Itsy Bitsy Reindeer (all 2016), and The Itsy Bitsy Snowman (2015)—the words are meant to be sung to the tune of the favorite nursery rhyme. In this outing, the rhymes work, but the meter is clunky. Rescek’s characters are cheery enough as they celebrate the transition from winter to spring. The question is why ducklings should replace spiders. “Down came the rain and chased the snow away” is simply not as satisfying as “washed the spider out.” The elements of danger, pluck, and mastery inherent in the original song are missing, as are the actions. A scene of anthropomorphic animals of different species sharing a den confuses rather than enlightens. There is no clear change from winter to spring; the color palette throughout is bright and springlike, and the duckling is about as realistic as an Easter Peep. Sturdy board pages may stand up to lots of handling, but young children are unlikely to ask for it more than once.

Toddlers are better served by a chorus of the original, accompanied by the finger motions . (Board book. 1-3)

Pub Date: Jan. 17, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4814-8655-2

Page Count: 16

Publisher: Little Simon/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: Feb. 14, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2017

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