FLINT by Paul Eddy

FLINT

KIRKUS REVIEW

Years after she was scarred and nearly killed by a double-dealing international criminal, a British undercover cop throws over the traces to go after him on her own—a busy first novel from journalist Eddy (Hunting Marco Polo, 1991, etc.)

"Finish it . . . Get it done," Inspector Grace Flint can still hear Frank Harling tell the confederate who murdered her partner in the sting operation that left her face shattered and her spirit cowed. Now that both have been rebuilt, she's been shuffled off to a desk job in Miami as the UK liaison to the Federal Crimes Joint Task Force. But when magnetic FBI officer Aldus Cutter invites her to get back in the saddle by posing as his wife to catch a merchant of counterfeit currency, two new developments end up emerging with startling clarity: (1) a line on what Harling's been up to since Flint last saw him fleeing the scene and where he might be holed up, and (2) an unmistakable hint that he's on the payroll of MI5, eating Her Majesty's bread along with Flint. Cutter's task force colleagues go after Harling, but they're a long step behind eager Flint. And a good thing too, because what Flint uncovers in her search for her would-be killer leads to an international conspiracy intricate and ambitious even by the standards of spy fiction, one whose tentacles reach to the highest levels of all the government agencies who are supposed to be backing Flint up-but may now be more interested in tracking her down.

Readers who don't mind the hiccup of the flashbacks that interrupt every third scene to backtrack anywhere from ten minutes ago to the heroine's childhood will find lots more surprises up Eddy's sleeve. A welcome debut, with a heroine volcanic enough for a series. (Film rights to Columbia)

Pub Date: Sept. 5th, 2000
ISBN: 0-399-14653-9
Page count: 352pp
Publisher: Putnam
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1st, 2000




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