Religion Book Reviews (page 175)

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1997

A remarkable look into the private sorrow of a public woman in what she called the ``dark chronicle of a broken heart.'' It is a story with all the elements of a great melodrama: the spurned love of an older woman for a younger man who appears to court her, then suddenly becomes engaged to a much younger woman; gossip and scandal in a closed social milieu; and a final, shocking revelation about the man in question, a scholar and leader in the community. Read full book review >
NAZIMOVA by Gavin Lambert
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 28, 1997

"The woman who brought Ibsen and Chekhov to large American audiences deserves a more thoughtful biography than this. (120 photos, not seen)"
Hollywood historian Lambert (Norma Shearer, 1990, etc.) covers the basics but scants the artistry of the great Russian-born actress (18791945). Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 24, 1997

"But in all, this is a remarkable book that will set a high standard for future studies of religion in the antebellum South."
An eloquent piece of narrative history that seeks to clarify one of American religion's most enduring puzzles: How did the South, once a culture highly resistant to evangelical revivalism, become the ``buckle'' of the Bible Belt? Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 11, 1997

"Serviceable as a reconstruction of a national disaster, but it fails to substantiate the conspiracy theories that inform it. (illustrations, not seen)"
An academic's speculative take on the April 19, 1995, blast that leveled the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people (including 19 children) and injuring over 500 more. Read full book review >
AFTER DEATH by Sukie Miller
NON-FICTION
Released: April 10, 1997

"Better to read the Tibetan Book of the Dead. (Quality Paperback Book Club alternate selection)"
Sound bites of ethnic beliefs and data from sessions with the author's psychotherapy clients are the material for this attempt to talk about what happens to us after death. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 4, 1997

"As anarchic and disorganized as Christianity itself, this book might be useful as a source of anecdotes for sermons or lectures. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A Catholic and a Protestant ransack the last 500 years in a search for some unifying characteristics of modern Christianity. Read full book review >
SOME FAR AND DISTANT PLACE by Jonathan S. Addleton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1997

Ultimately an appreciation—not without critical reflection— of a formatively marginalizing childhood in Pakistan, by the son of Georgia-born Baptist missionaries. Read full book review >
IMAGINED WORLDS by Freeman Dyson
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

"Essential reading for anyone who looks beyond the coming millennium."
A leading scientist speculates on far-future scientific developments and their possible impact on the human condition. Read full book review >
ISAAC BASHEVIS SINGER by Janet Hadda
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

"There, Singer comes off as far more human and complex than the cantankerous, cardboard character who emerges here. (17 photos, not seen)"
An analytical, unsympathetic portrait of the Nobel Prizewinning Yiddish writer. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1997

"American Jewish history."
The pioneering 1929 and 1937 sociological studies of ``Middletown''—the small city of Muncie, Indiana—said almost nothing about the community's 200 Jews. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

"A rare combination of scholarship, poetic sensitivity, and insight. (18 b&w photos, not seen)"
Russell (Mephistopheles: The Devil in the Modern World, 1986, etc.; History and Religious Studies/Univ. of Calif., Santa Barbara) offers a sensitive and intellectually alert survey of the concept of heaven, from its roots in Judaism and Greek philosophy through Dante's Paradiso. Read full book review >
GOD-TALK IN AMERICA by Phyllis A. Tickle
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

"A graphic expression of the superficiality of the current American religious situation."
Religious publishing, TV, and now the Internet have radically altered theological discourse in this country over the last 50 years, argues Tickle, who sees the developments as a vindication of all that the Reformation and American individualism stand for. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >