Religion Book Reviews (page 175)

RELIGION
Released: Jan. 6, 1993

"Well detailed—but the astonishing adventure of HPB's life too often gets lost beneath Cranston's piousness. (Photographs—not seen.)"
One of the towering—and most controversial—figures in occult history, Helena Petrovna Blavatsky (1831-91) cofounded the Theosophical Society and profoundly influenced the spread of Eastern and (many would say) pseudo-Eastern spiritual doctrines in the West. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Philosophical-minded readers will relish Murdoch's argument, surely one of the most elegant and impassioned metaphysical forays in recent years."
Though best known as a novelist, Murdoch (The Message to the Planet, 1989, etc.)—as her years teaching at Oxford attest—is a notable philosopher as well (Acastos, 1986, etc.). Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"These essays can't be said to chart unexplored regions, but the ground Ehrenfeld covers gets a good and thorough turning."
Ehrenfeld (Biology/Rutgers; The Arrogance of Humanism, 1978, etc.) lambastes some richly deserving hate objects—greedheads, death merchants, control freaks, lusters after power, mossbacks, and scofflaws—folks busy turning planet Earth into a spiritual and environmental cesspool. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Lively but unconvincing. (Thirty halftones, 10 line drawings—not seen.)"
An erudite argument that religion is ``systematic anthropomorphism: the attribution of human characteristics to nonhuman things or events.'' Students of religion and philosophy may sniff a familiar bone here. Read full book review >
CHAIM WEIZMANN by Jehuda Reinharz
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Not so much compelling as admirably—perhaps definitively- -detailed. (Photographs.)"
Well-documented but slow-moving second volume in Reinharz's monumental three-volume biography of Israel's first president (Chaim Weizmann: The Making of a Zionist Leader, 1985). Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Succinct, unpatronizing advice, sure to be of help to some of those who need it."
Another compassionate, down-to-earth bit of religious self-help from Smedes (Psychology/Fuller Theological Seminary; A Pretty Good Person, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Pealeism'' (George's coinage) with intelligence and tact: first-rate. (Thirty halftones—not seen.)"
A sympathetic biography of the controversial preacher that situates him in the mainstream of the American populist religious tradition. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 7, 1992

"A lively, much-needed history of a vital but overshadowed community."
A comprehensive history of the Sephardic Jews, from first- century Spain to recent developments in Syria. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Marxist-Leninism."
Something rare: a fair-minded assessment of religious fundamentalism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 30, 1992

"At best, a sophisticated analysis of a very real crisis, and an earnest plea for America to face some home truths; at worst, an experience akin to suffering from the blur of a 350-page Op-Ed piece."
A heartfelt and perceptive analysis of what Guinness (Visiting Fellow/The Brookings Institute; The Gravedigger File, 1983, etc.- -not reviewed) sees as the cultural crisis facing America today. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 19, 1992

"Admirable passion, then, but screwy logic."
Scathing attack on American Jews by the former editor-in-chief of Globes, Israel's leading business newspaper. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Nonetheless, for those who have the time, a gripper. (Photographs.)"
Cathedral-sized reconstruction of one year (September 1986- September 1987) in the life of the Catholic Church in America, by free-lance religion-journalist Briggs (National Catholic Reporter, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >