READY TO CATCH HIM SHOULD HE FALL by Neil Bartlett

READY TO CATCH HIM SHOULD HE FALL

Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

 An erotic fable, chockablock with literary allusion, about a homosexual subculture obsessed with a young man and his older lover. British writer Bartlett's fable--by turns graphic and romantic--traces the growth of the community from narcissism to tragedy and an apprehension of mortality. The narrator--the voice of the subculture--writes from a nameless city about the affair and eventual ``marriage'' of Boy and O, his older lover. The action centers on The Bar, run by Madame, a sort of earth mother protector. When the Boy arrives at The Bar, it's a great event to the narrator and his group, transforming their existence. The Boy, with his black shoes and shoebox full of letters from ``Father,'' would ``go home with anyone really.'' He's initiated by Miss Public House, who teaches him the ``repertoires of what you could and couldn't do....'' O was always at Madame's right hand, though never intimate with her. ``By sheer force of will power,'' Mother and the group try to push O and the Boy (``our two greatest beauties'') together. Finally, they become lovers, ``the kind of wanting which extends beyond the night into the day.'' Against a backdrop of gay-bashing in the vicinity, O and the Boy carry on their courtship, with O indulging various ``nocturnal speeches,'' before they announce their engagement, have a great costume party, and marry. This Family then takes sick ``Father'' home, and the Boy tends him through the stages of his illness until he becomes aphasic and dies, whereupon The Bar shuts for the seven days of the Family's mourning, and Madame (now Mother) leaves. But O ``will always be handsome. And Boy will always be beautiful, I think.'' This one survives some first-novel tics--mostly self-conscious literariness and cutesiness--to succeed as a celebration of homosexual love.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1991
ISBN: 0-525-93350-6
Page count: 320pp
Publisher: Dutton
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1st, 1991




MORE BY NEIL BARTLETT

FictionTHE DISAPPEARANCE BOY by Neil Bartlett
by Neil Bartlett
FictionTHE HOUSE ON BROOKE STREET by Neil Bartlett
by Neil Bartlett