Books by Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury, American novelist, short story writer, essayist, playwright, screenwriter and poet, was born August 22, 1920 in Waukegan, Illinois. He graduated from a Los Angeles high school in 1938. Although his formal education ended there, he became a "


THE STORIES OF RAY BRADBURY by Ray Bradbury
Released: April 6, 2010

"No surprises—just a major, one-of-a-kind talent in full regalia."
Dinosaurs, vampires, time-warps, Green Town, lions, ghosts, Martians (of course), dreadful trips to Mexico, "The Parrot That Met Papa" Hemingway, strangely dreamy movie-houses in Ireland—100 stories by the always surprisingly versatile Mr. Bradbury. Read full book review >
WE’LL ALWAYS HAVE PARIS by Ray Bradbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"Nothing too surprising, but the stories are pleasant and evocative."
Never-before-published stories from the prolific—and increasingly nostalgic—author of classics such as Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Writing for the fun of writing. A treat for the reader."
Two novellas from the big heart of an American original—one about time and music, the other a riff on Moby-Dick. Read full book review >
FAREWELL SUMMER by Ray Bradbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 17, 2006

"A thin work, heavily reliant on dialogue, but one that serves as an intriguing coda to one of Bradbury's classics."
Bradbury has yet another lesson to share about growing up and growing old. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"Essays made up mainly of declamation. Stick with the novels and stories that ensure Bradbury's place in the pantheon."
In three dozen pieces sometimes prickly and always passionate, SF/fantasy legend Bradbury fires off opinions galore on books, movies, SF and the people and places in his life. Read full book review >
THE CAT’S PAJAMAS by Ray Bradbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2004

"Bradbury on autopilot, mostly, mixing dashes of beautiful whimsy with gold-tinged nostalgia and the occasional sharp stab of pain."
Forgotten or mislaid short fictions from a master who's given us better, but also much worse. Read full book review >
BRADBURY STORIES by Ray Bradbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 5, 2003

"His linked stories transporting Middle America to Mars in The Martian Chronicles (1950) gave him his biggest boost to fame, and though these shady-porch tales today may have a cheesecloth quality to their poetry, they remain his bubbling first masterpiece, with the present volume their bookend."
Ray Bradbury, now 83, selects 100 of his most celebrated tales from a lifetime in print twice the length of Poe's. Read full book review >
LET’S ALL KILL CONSTANCE by Ray Bradbury
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 8, 2003

"Only one question remains: Has the superheated prose on display here finally caught up with the postmodernism of Don Webb's pastiches, or has postmodernism caught up with the prophetic Bradbury? Tune in next week."
A third sort-of-mystery for the screenwriter hero of Death is a Lonely Business (1985) and A Graveyard for Lunatics (1990), now grown old enough to be a disillusioned hack, but not old enough to have acquired a name. Read full book review >
ONE MORE FOR THE ROAD by Ray Bradbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 2, 2002

"Slight, affecting, voluble, exuberant—by a writer who feels life's even better than he can imagine."
Science fiction grandmaster Bradbury gathers together 25 stories, some half-baked, most unpublished. Read full book review >
FROM THE DUST RETURNED by Ray Bradbury
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"A far cry from the great early stories, but filled with a nostalgic charm that vitiates Bradbury's notorious rhetorical laxness and sentimentality. One of his most attractive and satisfying works in quite some time."
At last—a book you can judge by its cover. For this one sports a wonderfully macabre illustration born of Charles Addams's brief collaboration with master fantasist Bradbury, best known for such classic fiction as The Martian Chronicles (1950) and Fahrenheit 451 (1953). Read full book review >
AHMED AND THE OBLIVION MACHINES by Ray Bradbury
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 11, 1998

"Clearly labeled a fable, the tale has instruction built into most passages, but those passages are occasionally breathtaking."
From Bradbury (for adults, Quicker Than the Eye, 1996, etc.), a fantasy with moments of brilliance swamped by mystical befuddlement. Read full book review >
DRIVING BLIND by Ray Bradbury
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Typically diverse, veering between sentiment and nostalgia, and set forth in the curiously mannered, modern-antique style that has become Bradbury's trademark."
Arriving too late for a full review, grandmaster Bradbury's latest collection (Quicker Than the Eye, 1996, etc.) consists of 17 new tales and 4 reprints, 197497. Read full book review >
QUICKER THAN THE EYE by Ray Bradbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 7, 1996

"So-so material for the most part; fans hoping for another Martian Chronicles or October Country face certain disappointment."
A collection of 21 tales from the Grandfather fantasist—none of which have appeared in book form before, though our galley doesn't tell us where they have appeared before, if they have, or when they were written. Read full book review >
GREEN SHADOWS, WHITE WHALE by Ray Bradbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 28, 1992

"He has never written better."
Bradbury goes mainstream with a hymn to Ireland and alcohol, focusing on writing a screenplay with John Huston for the director's film Moby Dick. Read full book review >
Released: July 2, 1990

"A tall crock of kirsch and Classic Coke."
Hyperrhapsodic Hollywood fantasia borne on a soft-rubber mystery plot, or Moby Dick blown up on a trout's spine. Read full book review >
Released: March 26, 1990

"Nonlovers may find the fare a bit exotic and rich."
Bradbury, all charged up, drunk on life, joyous with writing, puts together nine past essays on writing and creativity and discharges every ounce of zest and gusto in him. Read full book review >
THE TOYNBEE CONVECTOR by Ray Bradbury
Released: June 23, 1988

"Lyrical word-collage pasted around candy people: fantasy that just evaporates—and maybe best suited to a YA audience."
Bradbury's first story sheaf since The Stories of Ray Bradbury (1980) finds him more lyrically Bradburyesque than ever, in 22 new fantasies. Read full book review >
DEATH IS A LONELY BUSINESS by Ray Bradbury
Released: Oct. 28, 1985

"Scott Joplin); and—on nearly every page—quirky blendings of creepiness and humor, innocence and decadence, nightmare and cartoon."
Though dedicated to the memory of mystery-writers Chandler, Hammett, Cain, and Macdonald, Bradbury's new novel—his first full-length fiction since Something Wicked This Way Comes—isn't really an homage to the hard-boiled detective genre. Read full book review >
DINOSAUR TALES by Ray Bradbury
Released: June 1, 1983

"With foreword and introduction and lots of pictures (less than half of this 144-page booklet is text): a boutique serving for only the least serious or the dinosaur-happy of Bradbury fans."
Bradbury, enchanted by dinosaurs since childhood, has packaged "all of his dinosaur stories": three much-anthologized old yarns, that is, plus three new items (a story and two short poems), together with illustrations by William Stout, Steranko, Kenneth Smith, Moebius, David Wiesner, Gahan Wilson, and Overton Loyd. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 12, 1977

"For those unfamiliar or previously unsympathetic, the rhymes are easily readable, sensitive on the average, and accessible for people of all ages and levels of sophistication."
To say that Ray Bradbury's poems are energetic would be an understatement: indeed, it is the sheer force of tautly calculated rhyme and meter which hurtles the reader of this volume through some interesting, if familiar, Bradbury territory. Read full book review >
LONG AFTER MIDNIGHT by Ray Bradbury
Released: Sept. 30, 1976

"But it is from the same materials that he draws the more frequent moments which make you think of clean woods after thunderstorms—or a soul-destroying city summer and squandered happiness."
After seven very long years, a new and generous (twenty-two stories) Bradbury collection. Read full book review >
DANDELION WINE by Ray Bradbury
Released: March 26, 1975

"The poignant quality of Bradbury's writing, the evocative elements that will capture others than his usual audience, combine to make this an unusual reading experience."
The impossibility of pigeon-holding Ray Bradbury as a science fiction writer is once again emphasized in this charming philosophical study of adolescence. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 28, 1973

"In either event, it might sell more copies than all this year's NBA nominees put together."
This sing-song collection of pretentious verse by the famous sci-fi author indicates once again, as if it needed proving, that most fiction writers have not the slightest aptitude for poetry. Read full book review >
MARS AND THE MIND OF MAN by Ray Bradbury
Released: July 18, 1973

"Fifty Mars photos will be an important feature."
An engaging, sporadically informative scan of Mars with coordinates locked in on the 1971-72 voyage of Mariner 9, by an ebullient panel consisting of an optimistic Bradbury, a cautious Clarke and their opposite academic numbers, Carl Sagan (Cornell) and Bruce Murray (Cal Tech) plus New York Times Science Editor Walter Sullivan as interlocutor before a California audience. Read full book review >
THE HALLOWEEN TREE by Ray Bradbury
Released: Sept. 1, 1972

"Still Bradbury-Moundshroud is a spectacular guide to the nether regions and this may well be (as Tom Skelton called it) 'both a trick and a treat' for other boys who are willing to plunge right in and let the devil take the doubters."
The lyric and expansive nostalgia for boyhood of Dandelion Wine, the extravagantly conjured atmosphere of Leon Garfield (but without his chilling intensity), the sometimes gratuitous fright-inciters (rattling bones and shuddering house) of the conventional Halloween story — all seem to temper the unabashed didacticism of the mysterious Mr. Moundshroud, who takes eight spookily costumed boys on a kite-and-broomstick timetrip in search of their friend Pippin and the meaning of Halloween. Read full book review >
I SING THE BODY ELECTRIC! by Ray Bradbury
Released: Oct. 21, 1969

"Rice Crispies."
Eighteen stories, Bradbury's first collection in five years. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 17, 1963

"Bradbury, in perfect orbit."
Whether the author's vision turns toward the future or peers into the past, his worlds of characters and their situations always carry the air of possibility. Read full book review >
R IS FOR ROCKET by Ray Bradbury
Released: Oct. 19, 1962

"The Long Rain, The Time Machine, Frost and Fire are a few more of these exotic stories which act as a beacon light in the field of science fiction."
A mansized capsule of the best of Bradbury- gleaned from magazines and books- and dedicated to "starry" eyed young men with time to dream of crossing the line between truth and fiction. Read full book review >
Released: June 15, 1962

"Definitely for all admirers."
A somewhat fragmentary nocturnal shadows Jim Nightshade and his friend Will Halloway, born just before and just after midnight on the 31st of October, as they walk the thin line between real and imaginary worlds. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 1, 1959

"The title is apt — the variety here is spice."
Science fiction and space give way here to the imaginative, fantastic and the inexplicable, in 22 stories that make up a swift kaleidoscope of patterns. Read full book review >
THE OCTOBER COUNTRY by Ray Bradbury
Released: Oct. 31, 1955

"The chilling imaginative virtuosity, the malignant momentum of terror, the occasional tenderness give these short stories a real superiority."
..... casts a somber spell, death is a familiar figure, and fancied fears assume a devastating reality. Read full book review >
THE GOLDEN APPLES OF THE SUN by Ray Bradbury
Released: March 19, 1953

"A very pleasant variety show."
A double dozen from a recognized science-fiction writer, these stories range further in subject than his expected field, so that this is not necessarily confined to bug-eyed monster devotees. Read full book review >
THE MARTIAN CHRONICLES by Ray Bradbury
Released: May 4, 1950

"None of the complexities of concepts or formulae, this has an imaginative rather than technical ingenuity."
A flight of fancy in time and space which transcribes some incidents which take place on the planet of Mars, there's a literary, visionary quality here and an avoidance of the more mechanistic aspects of this medium. Read full book review >
THE ILLUSTRATED MAN by Ray Bradbury
Released: Feb. 23, 1950

"A book which is not limited by its special field."
Scientific fiction enclosed in a frame — wanderer meets a tattooed man whose images foretell the future, leaving a space to preview the destiny of the viewer. Read full book review >