HARBOR  by John Ajvide Lindqvist

HARBOR

KIRKUS REVIEW

Scandinavian writers dominate the police-procedural genre. Are they now bent on taking over horror? Swedish creepmeister Lindqvist is hot on the case.  

The author of one of the scariest vampire novels to have come out in years, Let Me In (2007) (film version Let the Right One In), Lindqvist drifts squarely into Stephen King territory with his latest—which, it seems, is a bit of a roman à clef, reflecting the author’s childhood in a Stockholm housing development on the edge of the city. So it is with Domarö, an island not far from the Swedish capital where hoary old fishermen mend their nets and rough-edged yokels sharpen their knives, even as smart urbanites zip about in their fine cars and well-made clothes. One of those city slickers, a pensive fellow named Anders, suffers a terrible blow when his daughter, Maja, sees something mysterious, goes to have a look and disappears. “She was good at finding places to hide,” Anders reasons at first. “Although she could be over-excited and eager in other situations, when she was playing hide and seek she could keep quiet and still for any length of time.” Well, this is a very serious game of hide and seek indeed, for others on this island have gone missing, too—boatloads of them, with cases of schnapps as a gift to the critters that dwell in the spectral Baltic waters. Will Anders ever find his daughter? Perhaps, perhaps not—and therein hangs the tale. Lindqvist ventures on heavy-handedness by introducing a character who, a touch too conveniently, happens to be a retired magician with a trick up his sleeve (or, more to the point, in his matchbox) and lots of wisdom to dispense. In the main, though, he capably keeps his story far from the usual splatterfest slasher stuff and instead holds it to the confines of psychological thriller, which is plenty spooky enough, atmospheric and foreboding: “There is a film of moisture over everything and water drips from the leaves of the trees, as if this island has risen from the sea just to meet him.”

Perhaps not a book to read by the seashore, if you’re literal-minded. A spooky pleasure, expertly told.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 2011
ISBN: 978-0-312-68027-5
Page count: 512pp
Publisher: Dunne/St. Martin's
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15th, 2011




HAUNTING FICTION FOR HALLOWEEN:

Fiction THE HAUNTING OF MADDY CLARE by Simone St. James
by Simone St. James
Fiction LET ME IN by John Ajvide Lindqvist
by John Ajvide Lindqvist
Fiction ZONE ONE by Colson Whitehead
by Colson Whitehead

MORE BY JOHN AJVIDE LINDQVIST

FictionLET THE OLD DREAMS DIE by John Ajvide Lindqvist
by John Ajvide Lindqvist
FictionLITTLE STAR by John Ajvide Lindqvist
by John Ajvide Lindqvist
FictionHANDLING THE UNDEAD by John Ajvide Lindqvist
by John Ajvide Lindqvist

MORE BY MARLAINE DELARGY

MysteryTHE HIDDEN CHILD by Camilla Läckberg
by Camilla Läckberg
Fiction1222 by Anne Holt
by Anne Holt
FictionTHE HYPNOTIST by Lars Kepler
by Lars Kepler

SIMILAR BOOKS SUGGESTED BY OUR CRITICS:

FictionZOMBIES! ZOMBIES! ZOMBIES! by Otto Penzler
by Otto Penzler
IndieNIGHT CHILL by Jeff Gunhus
by Jeff Gunhus
FictionCARRION COMFORT by Dan Simmons
by Dan Simmons